High Schools

Additional High School Programming - Level 1, 2, & 3 Flexibility Allocations

Level 1 Flexibilities

NAF Career Academies

Program Purpose

DCPS currently has 21 NAF Academies (formerly known as National Academy Foundation) across 11 schools. The academy model is embedded with strong college and industry partnerships, internships, and rigorous curricula that culminate in industry-recognized certifications. All Academies are supported by Industry Advisory Boards whose members include local business leaders.

NAF Academies may receive funding support from both the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins) grant and the DC Career Academy Network (DC CAN) grant. Please refer to the “Career Education- Perkins Grant Supported” section of the Guide for relevant information.

Program Guidance

Requirements

OSSE requires NAF Academies to have a Director (NAF Academy Director, ET-6). Multiple Academies within the same school may share a Director, per the College and Career Programs Division’s approval. In some cases, the Director positions are funded externally (DC CAN or other grant) for the first two years, after which point the unit cost of a position will be added to school’s budget as part of their allocation to cover the Director position. These positions are required to ensure sustainability of the program, and Principals must use the funds as allocated.

The College and Career Programs Division requires NAF Academies to have Career Technical Education teachers (CTE Teacher, ET-15, unless otherwise noted) to sustain a quality program and schedule to required course offerings, as determined by a school’s master schedule. NAF Academy program requirements are as follows:

  • Students participate in 3-4 themed courses in sequence as well as take certain core academic classes in cohorts, at times determined by a school’s master schedule.
  • Programs start on the first day of school and end on the last full day of the school year.
  • NAF Academies are offered to high school students in grades 9th through 12th; schools determine if students begin their NAF Academy experiences and coursework in either 9th or 10th grade.
  • The curriculum for the 3-4 themed courses is determined by the theme of the Academy (e.g., Engineering, IT, Health Sciences, Hospitality).

How Funds Are Allocated

Personnel

All NAF related positions NAF Directors (ET-6), NAF Academy Managers (ET-8) and/or NAF Academy Coordinators (ET-10) are allocated and pre-loaded onto school budgets in the budgeting application based on advisory of the College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools and consultation with school leaders.

Non-Personnel

Academies that have applied for and awarded the DC CAN grant will receive Academy Activity Funds; the amount Academies receive will vary. These funds may be spent on supplies, professional development, equipment, marketing, and activities intended to support the success of students in the program. DC CAN grant funds are managed and controlled at school level by Principals and NAF Academy Directors. The College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools provides direct guidance on use of Academy Activity Funds.

Career Academies are also eligible to receive Perkins grant funds: See “Career Education- Perkins Grant Supported” section of the Guide for relevant information.

Menus of Options

Assistant Principal – If schools wish to have an Assistant Principal over the Academy, Principals should contact the College and Career Programs Division to discuss this option. To budget for the position, Principals should submit a petition and use flexible funding on to budget for the increased cost above the NAF Academy Director role. Unlike NAF Directors, Assistant Principals have evaluative authority and are required to hold OSSE Administrative licensure. As there is no specific AP-NAF Academy position, Principals should select the appropriate Assistant Principal position that fits their program. This Assistant Principal should primarily oversee the NAF Academy.

Central Support

Financial

Utilizing the centrally managed Perkins grants, the College and Career Programs Division supports the purchasing of supplies, professional development, equipment, marketing, and activities intended to support the success of students in the program. Requested Non-Personnel Services Funds must be spent on allowable uses according to Perkins Grant.

Non-Financial

The College and Career Programs Division at Central supports operations and implementation of Career Education programs, including but not limited to data collection and feedback reporting, professional learning and development, and management coaching and training. Additionally, they provide budget management and support to meet annual funding goals.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

DCPS CTE Website


Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)

Program Purpose

Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AJROTC) or Navy JROTC (collectively, “JROTC”) is a dynamic, challenging, and rewarding leadership development program based on the principles of performance-based, learner-centered education that promotes development of core abilities: capacity for life-long learning, communication, responsibility for actions and choices, good citizenship, respectful treatment of others, conflict resolution, and critical thinking techniques.

Program Guidance

Requirements

In the agreement between DCPS and the Department of Defense, JROTC programs must be staffed with two instructors:

  • Senior Instructor (Teacher – JROTC Department Chairman) who is a commissioned officer; and
  • Instructor who is a non-commissioned officer (Teacher – JROTC Instructor).

Unless otherwise noted, both Instructors must be ET-15 positions.

If a JROTC program has had two consecutive years with enrollment greater than 150 students, a third Instructor may be added in the third year, pending approval from DCPS and appropriate branch of US Military.

How Funds Are Allocated

The JROTC instructor’s salary is funded through a cost-sharing agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense unless the program is classified as an NDCC (National Defense Cadet Corps) program. DCPS schools pay the equivalent of a full-time position and the Department of Defense reimbursees per the cost-share agreement.

Under the advisory of the College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools and consultation with school leaders, JROTC Instructors will be pre-populated in your budget. This position cannot be removed without loss of funding.

Central Support

Financial

Central provides limited support for physical training uniforms and the City-Wide Dining Out event.

Non-Financial

The JROTC team within Central provides curriculum, teacher support, and IT equipment for JROTC classrooms. The JROTC team also leads the JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge Summer Camp which is available to JROTC students based on availability.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

U.S. Army Junior ROTC Website


Ninth Grade Academies (NGA)

Program Purpose

Ninth grade academies nurture first-year ninth grade students, so they transition successfully to high school, promotion, graduation, college, and career. Progress and results are measured by the following student outcomes:

  • On-track to promote rates each term and final promotion rates after summer school of each year.
  • School attendance as measured by an average in-seat attendance rate.
  • Student conduct and behavior as evidenced by the number of student suspensions and in active student engagement in academic tasks.

Effective Ninth Grade Academies in DCPS provide rich, responsive, and well-rounded educational experiences for students transitioning from eighth grade to succeed in ninth grade and beyond. Personalized instruction ensures that students have meaningful reasons to engage in school and that they experience energetic learning and work toward their individual and shared goals for future studies and careers. Successful Academies have strong student to adult connections, clear expectations of all facets of schooling create, and maintain a high-quality learning environment. The participating schools are Anacostia, Ballou, Cardozo, Coolidge, Eastern, Dunbar, Ron Brown, Roosevelt, and Woodson High Schools.

Program Guidance

Requirements

  • The Ninth Grade Academy program is subject to terms of the Title I grant which funds it.
  • Academy APs must be fully dedicated to academy implementation with additional duties as time permits.
  • Academy money must go directly to support academy students, teachers, and staff, and spend plans must meet the terms of the Title I grant.
  • DCPS offers this program as a strategy to increase the number of ninth graders who graduate from high school in four years. The schools that currently have this program – Anacostia, Ballou, Cardozo, Coolidge, Eastern, Dunbar, Ron Brown, Roosevelt, and Woodson High Schools – have a demonstrated need in this area.

NGA students are first-time 9th grade students who are registered in English 1 in the current school year. English 1 and at least 6 credits are required for promotion to the 10th grade and for graduation. “First-time 9th grade student” is defined as a student whose first 9th grade year is the current school year. Students receiving special education services with 20+ hours on their IEPs who are in self-contained classrooms and EL level 1 students are excluded.

How Funds Are Allocated

Every school is allocated an Assistant Principal to oversee academy operations, evaluate staff, and support students. Additionally, each academy is allocated a specific amount of administrative premium and non-personnel dollars relative to their size to fund academy operations and activities.

Menus of Options (Flexibilities)

Ninth Grade Academies spend their funds according to spend plans they create annually. There are no changes schools can make to allocations during the budget development process. However, adjustments can be made throughout the year as each academy AP works with the NGA central coordinator to reprogram funds to where they foresee the most need and based on where the school spent the most money the previous fiscal year. See the spending guidance included in helpful resources for more information.

Central Support

Financial

Each academy is allocated their own NPS and PS funds from the Title I grant. No additional financial support from central is provided.

Non-Financial

The Director of Ninth Grade Academies leads on-going, job-embedded professional development for ninth grade academy APs focusing on: leadership, facilitation skills, feedback to teachers, instructional practices, student engagement, cultural competence, DCPS curriculum and assessments, consistent grading practices, an assignment/point recovery model, and routine analysis of all data used to measure student progress.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

Evening Credit Recovery (ECR)

Program Purpose

Credit recovery is an alternative to course repetition for students who have previously failed a course required for high school graduation. Credit recovery targets the course standards in which students are deficient and allows students to work through the content in self-paced, competency-based manner. All high school students who fail a course required for graduation may be considered for enrollment in credit recovery. Credit recovery allows students an opportunity to earn course credit by demonstrating mastery of content at the same level of rigor as the original course, consistent with DCPS curriculum. This allows students who fail a graduation required course to continue to stay on-track or get back on-track for a timely graduation.

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY22, a total of 17 schools will receive Credit Recovery funds. Funding allocations are based on size of school, number of failures and anticipated course recovery needs, and program and funding usage during the prior year.

Credit recovery is formally offered and funded at the following schools:

Anacostia HS

Coolidge HS

Roosevelt HS

Ballou HS

Dunbar HS

Roosevelt STAY

Ballou STAY

Eastern HS

Ron Brown College Prep HS

Bard Early College HS

IYP/YSC

Wilson HS

Cardozo HS

Luke C Moore HS

Woodson HS

Columbia Heights EC

Phelps HS

  • If students need credit recovery courses, but attend a school that does not offer programming, those students can cross-enroll in an available program at another school upon approval form that program’s coordinator and applicable teacher.
  • In some limited instances, schools without formal credit recovery programming can offer credit recovery programming if there is a student need but must fund it with their own admin premium.

Requirements and Staffing Guidance:

The credit recovery budget allows schools to provide administrative premium to compensate credit recovery teachers. Instruction can take place after school or before school, and students must attend a minimum of three sessions per week. Student enrollment can take place on an ongoing basis throughout the year, and students should be awarded a grade and withdrawn from credit recovery once they complete all required elements of the course, rather than at a pre-determined interval. As this allocation is connected to DCPS Graduation Requirements, funds must be exclusively used for supporting credit recovery.

The default staffing model for DCPS credit recovery courses shall be as follows:

  • Credit recovery classrooms shall be staffed by teachers certified in relevant content area(s).
  • Credit recovery classrooms may contain students who are working on different courses, provided that the teacher is certified to instruct across all courses within her/his classroom.
  • The teacher to student ratio should not exceed 1:15 in credit recovery classes, if the teacher is teaching up to two courses at the same time. Teachers may be responsible for teaching up to three courses at a time but may only serve a total of 30 students across the three courses.
  • Credit recovery teachers are compensated $40/hour in administrative premium and should be provided 30 minutes of paid planning time for every three hours of teaching time.
  • An administrator and security must remain on site during credit recovery program hours.
  • Each high school will develop its own schedule for credit recovery courses and submit that schedule to the graduation excellence division for approval.
  • Each school should designate a staff member to coordinate credit recovery and monitor the program (see Menus of Options for staffing suggestions).

Budgeting/Spending Recommendations

Since credit recovery programming has ongoing entry and is self-paced, the length of each class is difficult to determine; however, schools should anticipate that most courses will operate for at least three terms. The table below details the cost (per teacher) for several different scenarios. Please note, the numbers below are estimates and may vary slightly based on the total days in each term, length of course, etc.

Minutes/day

Days per week

Planning time (Hrs)

Length (weeks)

Admin Premium

Cost

60

4

0.5

36

$40

$6,480

90

4

1

36

$40

$10,080

120

4

1.5

36

$40

$13,680

180

4

2

36

$40

$20,160

Schools should create a plan for credit recovery at the beginning of the year to determine which courses they are able to offer. This plan should be based on student need, teacher availability, and number of courses they can afford within their budget allocation.  

Menus of Options

Schools have the following scheduling and staffing flexibilities:

  • Length of Class: It is recommended that credit recovery courses take place for 60 – 120 minutes per day.
  • Classes per week: Classes can meet four or five days each week.
  • Multiple teachers: School can choose to hire multiple teachers to co-teach a course. Depending on budget and student need, a school could have two full teachers for the course, or the teachers could “split” a class (e.g., each teacher teaches two days per week).
  • Teacher aides: Schools also have the option to hire an aide (e.g., EL teacher or SPED support) to provide targeted support to students as needed.
  • Courses per Teacher: One teacher can teach multiple courses within the same content area.
  • Coordinate Program: It is highly recommended that each school have a designated staff member to monitor and coordinate the program. This can be a teacher, administrator, Pathways Coordinator, or other support staff.

If the coordinator is a WTU member, and is supporting credit recovery outside of, or in addition their tour of duty hours, they are eligible to earn Admin Premium.

If the coordinator is not a WTU member, they should work with their Administrator to create a flexible schedule to ensure they are not working excessive hours.

  • Principals may supplement their credit recovery allocation by using additional administrative premium funds to expand or improve the program, such as hiring additional staff or purchasing additional resources.  

Central Support

Central Office provides professional development opportunities monthly during the school year. Credit recovery coordinators are also included on relevant Central Office newsletters (e.g., College Prep, Counseling Weekly).

Points of Contact

Liz Wiemers, Director of Student Engagement, Graduation Excellence, Office of Secondary Schools, Elizabeth.Wiemers@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

DCPS Credit Recovery Policy


Twilight Academy

Program Purpose

Through the provision of Title I funding, the Twilight program offers opportunities for students to participate in original credit courses outside of the traditional school day at selected high schools. The Twilight program allows students who are behind in original course credits (not due to academic failure) to get back on a timely path to graduation by providing more flexibility in scheduling and completing courses. Twilight classes are taken in addition to, and not in place of, a full schedule taken during the traditional school day. This means that any students enrolled in Twilight courses must also be enrolled in a full schedule during the traditional day. All students who need to earn one or more original credits to get on-track for graduation may be considered for enrollment in Twilight. Twilight cannot be used to accelerate the academic progress of a student who is on-track to graduate. Students earn original credits by meeting the required seat hours and successfully completing assignments, assessments, and expectations consistent with DCPS curriculum.

Allocation Guidance

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY22, Twilight programming will be offered at all Title I comprehensive high schools. In some instances, students can cross-enroll in a Twilight program at another school if programming is not available at their home school.

SY21-22 High Schools with Twilight funding

Anacostia

Dunbar

Ballou

Eastern

Cardozo

Roosevelt

Columbia Heights

Ron Brown

Coolidge

Woodson

The exact amount of funding available to each school is determined based on past and projected student need. Typically, schools receive the same allocation year to year. However, since the overall grant funding is spread across all participating schools, there can be shifts to allocations if schools use significantly more or less of the allocation.

Restrictions

Twilight programing is funded by Title I funding and all funds must be exclusively used to compensate time spent in direct support of Twilight programming. A designated Twilight Coordinator or other designated staff member should track teacher time and must certify that all time billed to the Twilight fund was completed in service of Twilight programming.

Budgeting/Spending Recommendations

On average, a Twilight teacher position costs about $6,200 per 1-credit course. This includes 120+ hours of instruction, plus planning time. Full credit courses can be scheduled across 1, 2, or 4 terms. A half (.5) credit costs roughly $3,000 and can be scheduled across one or two terms. For more detailed information on cost please see the table below. Please note the numbers below are estimates and may vary slightly based on the total instructional days in each term.

Course credit

Length of course

Instructional hours / week

Planning per week

Admin Premium

# of weeks

Cost per class

1

1 term

15

2.5

$40/hour

9

$6,300

1

2 terms

7.5

1

$40/hour

18

$6,120

1

4 terms

3.75

0.5

$40/hour

36

$6,120

0.5

1 term

7.5

1

$40/hour

9

$3,060

0.5

2 terms

3.75

0.5

$40/hour

18

$6,120

Twilight funding operates on the Fiscal Year timeline; schools that anticipate offering TW courses in term 1 of the following school year should ensure that they maintain ample funding in their budget.

Staffing Requirements and Menus of Options

School schedules and staffing will vary across schools. Schools have the flexibility to create a schedule that best addresses the needs of their students and accommodates to teacher availability within their budget.

Each high school will develop its own schedule for Twilight courses based on the guidance below.

Twilight classes can be scheduled across one, two, or four terms. Course schedules and student enrollment should align with the start and end date of the term(s). Courses must be scheduled in such a way that students are able meet the minimum seat hour requirement – 60 hours (for a .5 credit course) or 120 hours (for a 1-credit course) – and must be staffed by a certified teacher.

  • Twilight classrooms shall be staffed by a teacher certified in relevant content area.
  • Teachers can only teach one Twilight course at a time and may not combine courses.
  • Full (1.0) credit courses can be offered across 1, 2, or 4 terms and can begin in any term.
  • Half (.5) credit courses can be offered across 1 or 2 terms and can begin in any term.
  • The teacher to student ratio should not exceed 1:15.
  • Twilight teachers are compensated $40/hour in administrative premium and should be provided 30 minutes of paid planning time for every three hours of teaching time to Twilight students that occurs outside of normal school hours.
  • An administrator and security must remain on site during Twilight program hours.
  • Students can cross-enroll and participate in Twilight programming at other schools.
  • It is recommended that schools designate a Twilight coordinator to oversee the program, such as the Pathways Coordinator, Counselor, or other student support team member.
  • It is not recommended that schools staff a Twilight course with more than one full time content teacher. If necessary, full, or part-time support staff can be hired to support EL students of students with IEPs.
  • Principals may supplement their Twilight allocation by using additional administrative premium funds from their own budget to expand or improve the program.
  • Twilight funds cannot be used for any other purpose. If schools feel that they will not use their entire Twilight budget or think they may require additional budget to fully fund the program, they should reach out to the Central Office POC to determine if reallocation is possible.

Schools should closely examine their student data at the beginning of the year and use the guiding questions below to help determine which courses they should offer via Twilight each year:

  • How many students at the school need the course?
  • Are there any potential graduates who need the course to graduate this year?
  • Of the students who need the course, can any or all of them be scheduled to take the course during the regular school day without disrupting their schedule?
  • Is another school offering the course in Twilight, where students could cross-enroll?

Schools should prioritize courses with a high student need, as well as any courses needed for graduation that cannot be taken at another school or during the school day.

Central Support

Central Office will support schools in monitoring teacher hours and submitting appropriate documentation of time worked per the Title I guidance. This will include providing coordinators with a timesheet for monitoring staff hours, an Admin Premium memo, monthly reminders for documentation submission, and monitoring of submissions with individual follow-up as needed.

Point of Contact

Liz Wiemers, Director, Student Engagement, Graduation Excellence, Office of Secondary Schools, Elizabeth.Wiemers@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

Twilight Program Overview


Level 2 Flexibilities

Career Technical Education (CTE)

Program Purpose

DCPS offers Career Education Pathways supported by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins) across 17 high schools. These Career Education Programs are not only rigorous and engaging, but they offer work-based learning and industry certification opportunities to help prepare students for college and career.

Career Education programs may receive funding support from both the Perkins grant and the DC Career Academy Network (DC CAN) grant. Please refer to the “NAF Career Academies” section of the Guide for relevant information.

Program Guidance

Requirements

Each Career Education program requires at least one qualified teacher, although that number increases as enrollments in the pathway increase. These positions are locally funded and are required to ensure sustainability of the program. Additionally, to access funds from the centrally managed Perkins grant, schools must maintain their specified level of Career and Technical Education (CTE) Teachers noted for Principals in the budget application.

How Funds Are Allocated

The College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools works with the School Finance team and consults with Principals to ensure proper staffing levels are reflected in budget allocations.

The amount of Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers that are required for the school to maintain funding from the Perkins grant are pre-loaded into QuickBase for Principals as a required position and labeled as Perkins supported. Additional CTE teachers are included in the general education teacher allocation and are pre-budgeted as CTE teachers based on programming at the school.

Budgeting Recommendations/Menus of Options

Based on a school’s master schedule, CTE Teachers can also teach core content courses. When budgeting for one teacher who teaches both CTE and Core courses, please use the option in which the teacher spends most of their time.

CTE positions that are allocated to schools are done so to meet the curricular programmatic requirements, sustain a quality program, and ensure continuity of a program of study. These allocations may be repurposed through a petition, and Principals must demonstrate how they will still meet any programmatic requirements (DCPS and citywide) with the proposed change.

Central Support

Financial

Utilizing the centrally managed Perkins grants, the College and Career Programs Division supports the purchasing of supplies, professional development, equipment, marketing, and activities intended to support the success of students in the program. Requested Non-Personnel Services Funds must be spent on allowable uses according to Perkins grant.

Non-Financial

The College and Career Programs Division at Central supports operations and implementation of Career Education programs, including but not limited to data collection and feedback reporting, professional learning and development, and management coaching and training. Additionally, they provide budget management and support to meet annual funding goals.

Points of Contact

Level 3 Flexibilities

Opportunity Academies and Pathways

Program Purpose

DCPS continues to prioritize supporting over-aged and under-credited students towards earning a high school diploma and achieving postsecondary success through Pathways programming at 13 high schools and intensive supports and targeted programming at Opportunity Academies.

Pathways Coordinators work directly with a caseload of over-aged and/or under-credited students to ensure they understand what they need to graduate and are receiving the right supports and services. They also work across departments within the schools to streamline efforts and lead programming to help all students get and stay on-track towards graduation.

Opportunity Academies are schools designed to serve students who are academically off-track and could benefit from an alternative setting. Opportunity Academies serve students who are significantly behind academically and support these students by offering Summit (competency-based) Learning, college prep courses, and Career and Technical (CTE) courses, which help students stay engaged and work towards a meaningful high school diploma.

How Funds Are Allocated

The following schools have an allocated Pathways budget for FY22. Each Opportunity Academy receives an allocation for a Pathways Coordinator position and an additional allocation of $150,000 in Pathways funding to be used in accordance with their spending plan (see below). Non-Opportunity Academy Pathways schools receive an allocation for a Pathways Coordinator position.

SY21-22 Pathways High Schools

Anacostia HS

Ballou HS

Ballou STAY

Cardozo HS

Columbia Heights EC

Coolidge HS

Dunbar HS

Eastern HS

Luke C. Moore HS

Roosevelt HS

Roosevelt STAY

Ron Brown College Prep HS

Wilson HS

Woodson HS

DCPS operates the following Opportunity Academies:

SY21-22 Opportunity Academies

Ballou STAY

Luke C. Moore HS

Roosevelt STAY

Each Opportunity Academy is allocated $150,000 of funding. This flexible funding can be used for additional professional development, technology, and student programming investments. It can also be petitioned to budgeted as personnel dollars. Principals must submit a plan to the Instructional Superintendent, which includes measures of success, to spend this funding in support of students.

Budgeting Recommendations/Menus of Options

Pathways Coordinator positions are full time roles that should not be combined with other positions at the school. The Pathways Coordinator is a dedicated staff member charged with ensuring all students who are off-track to graduation complete individualized learning plans, are scheduled properly, and have the supports they need to be successful. The Pathways Coordinator collaborates with school staff (e.g., school counselors, social workers, College and Career Coordinators, etc.) to monitor the adjusted cohort graduation rate report and individual progress towards graduation to help the school leadership develop strategies to support all students who are off-track. They are also tasked with creating, leading, and monitoring school-level initiative and programming that support off-track or at-risk students.

Schools that do not budget for a Pathways Coordinator should provide a robust plan to Central Office detailing how they will continue to meet the individual and programming needs of academically off-track or at-risk students.

Principals can tailor the position to their school needs; an example of core roles and responsibilities is below.

Pathways Supports and Responsibilities

Manage caseload of off-track or at-risk students to monitor and improve outcomes

Create strengths-based intervention plans for students on caseload

Serve as Twilight Coordinator and/or Credit Recovery coordinator

Work with student support team(s) at school to support intervention efforts around attendance, behavior, and academics

Monitor disengaged student list and lead efforts to locate and reengage students

Oversee credit recovery programming

Facilitates afterschool events, special events, field trips, and incentives to help students work towards their goals

Monitor adjusted cohort graduation rate report

Develop school-wide strategies to support all students who are off track

Meet with students individually and in small groups to support goals

Connect students with resources

Opportunity Academies have significant flexibility in spending their funding but must submit a detailed plan to their Instructional Superintendent for approval. These plans should be submitted to Sarah Navarro during the budget development timeline. Below are recommendations and best practices for budget allocation in Opportunity Academies.

OAs are encouraged to spend money on:

OAs are not encouraged to spend money on:

Resources that meet specific identified student needs

Promotional materials/ “SWAG”

Supports that focus on professional development for staff and leadership

One-time engagements/events

External partners and programming to advance opportunities for students

Incentives

Expanded programming for students

Technology and other supplies

Central Support

Financial

Pathways Coordinators are provided a request form and may request funding up to $1,500 per year to support approved programmatic activities at their school

Non-Financial

Central Office provides:

  • Monthly professional development meetings for Pathways Coordinators along with professional development opportunities created by other Central Office teams– e.g., Counseling, College and Career Prep.
  • Data and guidance to help Pathways Coordinators identify and monitor their student caseload and overall school performance on key metrics.

Points of Contact

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