All School Types

Level 1 Flexibility Allocations

Early Childhood Education

Program Purpose

DCPS’ Early Childhood Education program ensures that all of our youngest students are prepared for success in kindergarten and beyond. The Early Childhood program focuses specifically on Pre-K3 (PK3) and Pre-K4 (PK4) students and supports their kindergarten readiness by promoting high quality instruction and learning experiences in all Pre-Kindergarten (PK) classrooms, and by supporting families who are furthest from opportunity through the provision of family services that include case management, family workshops, and additional parent engagement activities. While PK programming supports all PK3 and PK4 students in all elementary schools and education campuses, schools that serve higher percentages of at-risk students and families receive more robust instructional coaching and family support services.

Program Guidance – Requirements

Staffing (Personnel Services)

It is DCPS policy that:

  • Every early childhood classroom (PK3, PK4, and mixed age) has one full-time teacher and one full-time aide.
  • Staff-to-child ratios (two adults per class) must always be maintained.
  • Staff must be in the classroom during their tour of duty and available to fulfill instructional tasks whenever students are present. A classroom must maintain appropriate ratios during all hours of program operation.
  • Staff must directly supervise children during all daily routines, including sleeping, eating, and diapering or bathroom use.
  • Mixed-age classrooms are allowed in early childhood programs to serve PK3 and PK4 students together, although non-mixed age classrooms are recommended. Mixed age classrooms cannot include children of kindergarten age.
  • In mixed age classrooms, staff-child ratios and group size maximums must be determined by the age of the majority of children and the needs of children present.

Newly Enrolling PK Children with Special Needs

To comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) “child find” requirement, Early Stages identifies children with special needs who are not yet enrolled in school. If a child is eligible for an individualized education plan (IEP), DCPS must provide an opportunity for the child to enroll. Consequently, a small number of seats are reserved in PK3 and PK4 classrooms in all DCPS schools for students with IEPs. This provides a system-wide network of available placements into which DCPS can enroll children as close to their homes as possible. This work happens year-round, so it is common that Early Stages placements may occur late in the year after the typical age cut off.

Unique Programs

Early Learning Support

The Early Learning Support (ELS) program is designed to meet the individual needs of students with developmental delays. Students in the ELS program have full-time IEPs (20+ hours of specialized instruction outside of general education) and frequently require a range of related services, such as speech and language, occupational therapy, and physical therapy.

Communication & Education Support

The Communication & Education Support (CES) program is designed to meet the individual needs of students with significant communication issues and significant behavior issues. Primarily, CES classrooms serve students who have Autism Spectrum Disorders. Students who have full-time IEPs (20+ hours of specialized instruction outside of general education) may also be served in CES classrooms.

10:6 Inclusion Classroom

The 10:6 Early Childhood Education Classroom represents a type of inclusion model used to serve students with disabilities in DCPS. The 10:6 Early Childhood Education Classroom is a general education classroom and does not constitute a more restrictive environment. The classrooms are staffed with a general education teacher, a special education teacher, and a paraprofessional and maintain a student ratio of ten general education students and six students with special needs. Typically, these students have a Developmental Delay (DD), Other Health Impairment (OHI), demonstrate delays in cognition, communication, social/emotional, motor, and adaptive skills. The following schools have 10:6 classrooms: Amidon-Bowen ES, Burroughs ES, Cleveland ES, Francis Stevens ELC, Garrison ES, and J.O. Wilson ES.

These programs (ELS, CES, and 10:6) are allocated by the special education team.

Classroom Sizes

Class Type

Classroom Composition

Staff: Child Ratio

PK3

3-year-olds

2:16

PK4

4-year-old

2:20

Mixed Age

3 and 4 year olds. No more than 50% may be 3-year-olds.

2:17

Early Learning Support (ELS)

3 and 4 year olds

2:10

10:06

3 and 4 year olds

3:16

Communication and Education Support (CES)

3 and 4 year olds

3:08

How Funds Are Allocated

Staff for PK programs are allocated using a staffing ratio to ensure that each classroom has required staff. Every PK classroom will have at least two staff members – one lead teacher and one instructional aide.

Budgeting Recommendations

Personnel

Principals of schools with PK programs must ensure there is at least one additional school-based staff member available to support PK classrooms when one of the classroom teachers or aides takes a break.

For increased instructional development, Principals may consider hiring an early childhood instructional coach, rather than using the centralized early childhood education (ECE) coaching program, provided that the coach has early childhood instructional expertise.

Non-personnel

Schools should budget for consumable and non-consumable classroom supplies such as:

  • Pull-Ups and wipes (all PK, but PK3 especially), paper; paint, glue, crayons, sand, etc.)
  • Manipulatives; blocks; puzzles; books

Schools can also consider budgeting some funding for field trip experiences and for inner core materials for younger students.

Menus of Options

Relay Residents: If there are ECE aides interested and applying to the resident program roles or Principals are interested in hosting a resident, Principals may hire residents as ECE aides.

Centrally Funded School Supports

The DCPS Early Childhood Education Division (ECED) provides a variety of centrally-funded supports to ensure high-quality early childhood programming in schools. The supports are differentiated to provide a baseline level of ECE support to all schools and to target the most robust supports to schools serving young children furthest from opportunity. The centrally funded supports include the following:

  • ECE Instruction – ECED provides early childhood instructional coaching support to schools. Schools serving large percentages of PK students who meet the at-risk criteria receive an instructional specialist (shared across schools) who serves as the ECE LEAP leader and coach. Other schools are assigned an ECE instructional specialist who serves in a consultant role to the school based ECE LEAP leader. ECED also provides instructional support through the development and implementation of PD sessions and the provision of a variety of instructional resources and supports on Canvas.
  • Family Support – ECED has a team of Family Service Specialists who are assigned to schools serving high percentages of students who meet the at-risk criteria. These specialists work closely with the school-based team to support families of DCPS’ youngest learners as they acclimate to the school environment, advocate for their children, and support their children’s learning at home. These specialists support schools and families through the provision of family services that include case management, family workshops, and additional parent engagement activities. They also serve on the school-based attendance team and partner closely with school-based social work or social-emotional learning (SEL) staff.
  • Curriculum – All early childhood classrooms (other than Montessori classrooms at Nalle, Langdon, and Capitol Hill Montessori) must use Creative Curriculum, a research-based curriculum approved by the Early Childhood Education Division. ECED can provide Creative Curriculum training for new PK teachers and administrators at all schools and provides replacement curriculum kits to schools as needed.
  • GOLD – ECED is responsible for the contract for the Teaching Strategies GOLD, the online assessment system used in PK classrooms. ECED also provides GOLD training.
  • Classroom Supplies – ECED has a limited budget to support the purchase of replenishment supplies for early childhood classrooms. Teachers who need replacement supplies may contact ECED (earlychildhood@k12.dc.gov) to inquire about those supplies. Because the ECED supply budget is limited, schools should plan to purchase consumables (paint, paper, crayons, paper towels, etc.) for their PK classrooms.

Points of Contact

Cheryl Ohlson (Cheryl.ohlson@k12.dc.gov) or Julie Shuell (Julie.shuell@k12.dc.gov)

Helpful Resources

Early Childhood DCPS Way site.


English Learners (ELs)

Program Purpose 

Students identified as having English Language Proficiency (ELP) levels between Level 1 and Level 4.9 are entitled to receive federally mandated English as a Second Language (ESL) services. ESL/bilingual teachers and classroom support staff are allocated to meet the language needs of the EL students. This allocation ensures all schools receive adequate resources, based on the size of the English Learner (EL) student population at their school and the language needs of the students. 

Requirements 

EL students should have access to all programming offered within the school community. This relates to academic, related arts as well as extra-curricular opportunities. As ESL services are federally mandated, ESL teachers and the general education teachers should work together so that EL students have a clear academic plan that supports access to grade level content and appropriate supports for their language development throughout the day. EL requirements are included in the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR).

How Funds Are Allocated 

EL Teachers: Schools receive allocations of ESL teachers based on the ratios below. Instructional positions allocated based on the number of projected EL students must be dedicated exclusively to work in service of the EL students and should not be assigned for other purposes. Schools with a projected enrollment of 11 or fewer EL students will receive an allocation for an itinerant ESL teacher. This allocation of staff is managed by the Language Acquisition Division (LAD). Schools are assigned to Itinerant ESL teachers by the LAD and this allocation cannot be used for other purposes. 

# of Students 

Teacher Allocation 

11 EL students or more 

1 ESL/Bilingual teacher for every 22 students, rounded to the nearest 0.5 FTE 

Fewer than 11 EL students 

Itinerant ESL teacher  

Note:  Dual-Language (DL) programs serve as the ESL Service Delivery Model for native Spanish-speaking EL students. Accordingly, an EL teacher allocation may be used for a DL position. All DL schools must ensure that additional ESL positions are held to support the language needs of EL students who speak languages other than Spanish. This is in addition to the regular DL programming

ESL Teacher Responsibilities 

School-Based ESL Teacher (Part-Time or Full-Time):

The ESL teacher’s main responsibility is to provide English language development instruction with a focus on building skills in all four language domains (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) using the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) English Language Development Standards and following the DCPS curriculum. All ELs should receive appropriate ESL services as determined by LAD guidelines. Some students, depending on their ELP level and past educational experiences, may need additional support. ESL teachers should be assigned to specific grade levels as staffing permits. ESL, general education, and special education teachers should collaborate to develop appropriate academic plans for EL students. ESL teachers may provide supports through inclusion (effective inclusion requires dedicated collaborative planning time that is scheduled regularly), pull-out/small group instruction, content-based ESL (distinct language development and content classes), and DL instruction. 

Itinerant EL Services Model: 

LAD gives Itinerant ESL teachers school assignments based on enrollment information available in August. School enrollment information and school assignments are updated as needed and are subject to change. Principals will be informed of their assigned Itinerant ESL teacher prior to the opening of the school year.

The Itinerant ESL teachers will collaborate with grade level classroom teachers to create a schedule that ensures appropriate ESL services for the EL students. As ESL services are federally mandated, classroom teachers must partner with the Itinerant ESL Teacher to support student achievement and progress. Any questions or concerns regarding Itinerant ESL teachers should be directed to Rosanna.demammos@k12.dc.gov.

EL Support Positions: 

Schools receive allocations of EL support positions based on the ratios below. Bilingual Counseling positions should be dedicated exclusively to working with EL students and their families. The Bilingual Counselor may not be used to substitute or supplant the counseling needs of the general student (non-EL) population. For support with proficiency screening for either Bilingual Counselors or EL Aides, contact Vicki.de-javier@k12.dc.gov

# of Students 

EL Support Position 

Responsibilities/Roles 

100 EL students  

Bilingual Counselor 

• Provide bilingual student and family support and counseling 
• Provide scheduling recommendations to the master schedulers and Principal based on the language development needs of the students 
• Hold bilingual parent workshops (interpretation is available through the Language Access Unit) 
• Function as a liaison with community partners serving the Linguistically and Culturally Diverse (LCD) families. An LCD student comes from a family where English is not spoken and can be either an English Learner themselves or English Proficient.

50 EL students at a level 1 English

EL Instructional Aide 

• Provide translation of school-based documents
• Serve as interpreter for LCD families
• Support the instructional needs of EL students

Budgeting Recommendations/Menus of Options 

Principals should identify staff members to serve in the following capacities: 

  • ESL Point of Contact (POC): Schools may designate a staff member/liaison to LAD who will serve at the ESL POC for compliance related to English learners. This ESL POC can support the school with Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) compliance for ELs including referrals to the Welcome Center and mandated state assessment coordination. Schools should provide the ESL POC with a prep period (or the equivalent of) for completion of Compliance Tasks, ACCESS coordination and planning to be done with the Testing Coordinator, and other duties, including sharing EL data and information with school staff. Schools should budget administrative premium to compensate this paid prep period.
  • ESL Department Chair: Secondary schools, with more than four ESL teacher positions may have an ESL department chair as one of their four non-core department chairs through the typical department chair selection If the department chair meets the above two conditions, the stipend is funded centrally.

Menu of Options:

  • EL Teachers may be used to create Teacher Leader or Instructional Coach positions focused on strategies and best practices when working with EL students in the school.
  • EL Teacher positions may be used to create Reading Specialist positions dedicated to providing targeted reading supports to EL stu Note- This will only be recommended when appropriate ESL services/supports are secured with remaining EL staff. 
  • EL Aide positions may be used to create Urban Teacher Resident (UTR) positions or used towards the Relay Residents if they will be dedicated to work with EL students. 
  • Bilingual Counselor positions may be used to create Bilingual Social Worker positions. The role of Bilingual Social Workers is to work with dually identified EL students with IEP’s based on language support needs. The Bilingual Social Worker should also provide support to families dealing with the trauma or border detention, fears around immigration status, the trauma of family reunification, and other challenges being experienced by the EL/LCD communities.

Considerations

When planning use of the funding schools receive for all students, including ELs, please consider the following: 

  • How are EL students included in enrichment and intervention opportunities? Do the enrichment and intervention opportunities have built in supports/considerations for ELs? 
  • How is the professional development (PD) plan for the school inclusive of the PD needs of staff working with ELs? 
  • How are school banners, T-shirts, etc. providing affirming messages for the linguistically and culturally diverse (LCD) community? Are banners, signs, T-shirts etc. available in the languages represented at the school? 
  • How are school and community partnerships creating a plan for bilingual family and mental health supports? 
  • How could school funds be used to supplement the EL funded positions, identified above, to better equip the school? 

Central Support 

Financial 

Principals should remain in close communication with the LAD, as there may be available funding for EL student/family engagement opportunities. Examples of past school uses of Title III funding have included: 

  • EL family Saturday Academies 
  • Purchase of EL Blended Learning licenses specific to school need 
  • Purchase of bilingual dictionaries 

Non-Financial 

The LAD can support schools in the following ways:

  • Language Access support (translationand interpretation) can be provided through the Language Access Unit. Contact de-javier@k12.dc.gov for more information or use the links above. 
  • Professional Development/Coaching support is available through the LAD Instructional Unit and through the Cluster Support Model (CSM). Reach out to the assigned LAD CSM member for the school cluster. 

Points of Contact 


Special Education

Purpose

Special education services ensure eligible students with disabilities can successfully access instruction. Teachers and paraprofessionals support students inside general education classrooms, in resource rooms, and in specialized self-contained program classrooms to address individual needs and provide standards-based instruction.

Program Guidance

Requirements

The purpose of the Individuals with Disabilities Education (IDEA) Act is “to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living” §1400(d)(1)(A).

In accordance with IDEA, schools are required to provide the supports and services outlined in each child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) in the form of specialized instruction, related services, and assessments. Other special education requirements fulfilled by schools and school staff include child find, progress monitoring, and parent engagement. Special education requirements and opportunities in DCPS are also found in the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR).

Schools are required to include a Local Education Agency (LEA) representative as part of each IEP team. Principals automatically fill this role. Special education coordinators or other roles of special education administration have this role included in their tour of duty. If schools plan to designate an eligible and qualified staff member that is a teacher or TLI, they will need to compensate the individual with extra-duty pay and should budget for it in the line called “Special Education LEA Representative Designee.” The rate is $638/year for elementary schools and $798/year for a high school.

How staff are allocated:

Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocation Model

The Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocation Model is used to calculate the number of special education teachers allocated for students who have specialized instruction hours in their IEPs and are not in specialized self-contained programs. The model is based on the hours of instruction in each student’s IEP and the setting in which the instruction is to be provided.

Students with specialized instruction hours both inside and outside of general education are counted twice: once toward the appropriate inside general education ratio and once toward the appropriate outside general education ratio. Students whose IEPs contain only related services do not count toward the teacher staffing total.

Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocation Classifications

Setting: Inside General Education

Teacher: Student Ratio

Setting: Outside General Education

Teacher: Student Ratio

Students with fewer than 11 hours per week in IEP

1:15

Students with fewer than 11 hours per week in IEP

1:24

Students with 11 or more hours per week in IEP

1:12

Students with 11 to 19 hours per week in IEP

1:12

Small School Allocations

Schools with 65 or fewer inclusion students receive automatic minimum Inclusion/Resource Teacher allocations. The small school allocations ensure schools receive enough staffing to provide services across their entire grade distribution.

Small School Minimum Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocations

Total Number of Inclusion Students

Number of FTE Inclusion/Resource Teachers Allocated

1 to 15

1.0

16 to 25

2.0

26 to 45

3.0

46 to 55

4.0

56 to 65

5.0

10:6 Inclusion Classroom Support

Schools with 10:6 Inclusion classrooms, as previously determined by Early Stages, are allocated an additional Inclusion/Resource Teacher to support classroom instruction for students with disabilities.

Example: Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocation Model

Setting: Inside General Education

Setting: Outside General Education

Teacher-Student Ratio

Number of Students Projected

Number of Teachers

Teacher-Student Ratio

Number of Students Projected

Number of Teachers

Fewer Than 11 Hours Per Week

1:15

46

3.09

Fewer Than 11 Hours Per Week

1:24

38

1.57

11 or More Hours Per Week

1:12

22

1.79

11-19 Hours Per Week

1:12

15

1.26

No Hours Per Week

N/A

9

0

No Hours Per Week

N/A

24

0

Total

76

4.88

Total

76

2.83

4.88 + 2.83 = 7.71

Total Inclusion/Resource Teacher Allocation = 8 Teachers

Specialized Self-Contained Programs Staff Allocation Model

Specialized self-contained programs serve a specific population of students who require the highest level of support, in accordance with their IEPs, to access the curriculum. Teachers, paraprofessionals, and behavior technicians are allocated to each self-contained classroom according to the table below. For example, if a school has two Communication & Education Support (CES) classrooms, they will be allocated two teachers and four paraprofessionals.

Self-Contained Program Type

Teacher: Student Ratio for the Program

Teacher Allocation

Paraprofessional Allocation

Behavior Technician Allocation

Nurse Allocation (Managed by Central Office)

Behavior & Education Support (BES)

1: 10 (ES/MS)

1: 12 (HS)

1

1

1

-

Communication & Education Support (CES)

1:8

1

2

-

-

Early Childhood Communication & Education Support (CES)

1:6

1

2

-

-

Early Learning Support (ELS)

1:10

1

1

-

-

Independence & Learning Support (ILS)

1:10

1

1

-

-

Medical & Education Support (MES)

1:8

1

2

-

1

Sensory Support

1:12

1

1

-

-

Specific Learning Support (SLS)

1: 12 (ES/MS)

1: 15 (HS)

1

1

-

-

Additional Support for Specialized Self-Contained Programs

  • Early Learning Support (ELS) Paraprofessionals: Schools with both PK3/PK4 and K-2 Early Learning Support (ELS) classrooms are allocated one (1) additional paraprofessional to support classroom transitions, toileting, and station-based teaching across the two classrooms.
  • Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs): Schools with at least four (4) Communication & Education Support (CES) classrooms and schools with MS or HS Communication & Education Support – HFA Inclusion classrooms are allocated a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) to support students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their teachers, conduct social skills groups, implement executive function curriculum, conduct functional behavior assessments, and implement behavior intervention plans, as well as support general education teachers in engineering the general education environment for students with ASD.

Menus of Options

What are the flexibilities in special education staff allocations?

Allocated Position

Previously Approved Alternatives

Notes

Paraprofessional

Urban Teacher Resident

Relay Teacher Resident

Urban Teacher Residents and Relay Teacher residents can help to create a teacher pipeline in schools.

Teacher – Inclusion/Resource

TLI Teacher Leader – Special Education

Coordinator – Special Education

If a school wants to reduce the number of Inclusion/Resource teachers from what is allocated, they will need to demonstrate how student IEP hours will continue to be met.

Local Education Agency (LEA) Representative Designee

  • Under IDEA, each IEP team is to include an individual who serves as the “LEA representative.” This person must be:
    • Qualified to provide or supervise the provision of specialized instruction to meet the unique needs of children with disabilities.
    • Knowledgeable about the general education curriculum; and
    • Knowledgeable about the availability of resources of the LEA.
  • The Principal is the default LEA representative. Principals must identify at least one other staff member to serve as their designee. The LEA representative designee cannot be the School Psychologist.
  • In addition to serving as the LEA representative designee, the responsibilities of the position include:
    • Ensuring special education teachers are meaningfully engaged in content-level co-planning, using student data to develop lessons that are aligned to the CCSS and appropriately modified and accommodated to meet the needs of individual students.
    • Completing regular observation and feedback of teachers, behavior technicians, and paraprofessionals on the implementation of lesson plans.
    • Overseeing IEP and assessment quality, timeliness, and compliance by supporting case managers to effectively manage their caseloads; and
    • Leading the special education team in building cohesive and trusting relationships with families.
  • Below are the positions schools may already have on their budgets to fulfill the LEA Representative Designee Role. Please note that schools may not add this position to their budget if it is not already allocated.
    • Assistant Principal – Special Education
    • Director – Specialized Instruction (DSI)
    • Manager – Specialized Instruction
  • Schools may invest in the following positions to support instruction and/or compliance, as well as serve as the LEA Representative Designee. Only Special Education Coordinators are considered LEA Representative Designees as part of their tour of duty and are, therefore, not eligible for extra duty pay. TLIs are eligible for extra duty pay.

Position

Notes

Coordinator – Special Education (CSE)

Supports compliance

TLI Teacher Leader – Special Education

Supports all teachers with specially designed instruction in both the general and special education settings.

Central Support

Financial

Supports That May Be Required by the IEP

  • Assistive Technology
  • Dedicated Aides
  • Dedicated Nurses
  • Related Service Providers (g., Audiologists, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapists, Speech-Language Pathologists)
  • Itinerant Vision Teachers

Self-Contained Classroom Supports

  • Nurse Allocations for MES classrooms
  • Specialized curriculum and interventions
  • Specialized assessments

Non-Financial

  • The Division of Specialized Instruction participates in the Cluster Support Model. Each school has an assigned Manager of Accountability and Manager of Inclusion.
  • Specialists on the Academic Programs team in DSI support self-contained program
  • DSI provides special education professional development sessions on district-wide professional development days.

Points of Contact

Division of Specialized Instruction (dcps.specialed@k12.dc.gov)

Helpful Resources

Canvas

School Mental Health

Program Description

The School Mental Health (SMH) Team ensures the clinical efficacy for services provided by School Psychologists and Social Workers including screening, early intervention, evidenced-based treatment and practice, assessment, professional development, and consultation. School Psychologists and Social Workers are hired for specific areas of work that support both academic and social-emotional growth. Their roles are defined and should be limited to their areas of expertise to ensure their contributions to the students, staff, and the broader school community are effective.

How Funds Are Allocated

The SMH team supports schools in determining mental health staffing models that best meet the needs of school communities using a formula that considers variables such as:

  • School size
  • The needs of general education students
  • The number of students receiving specialized instruction and related services and
  • Other data points.

The team analyzes the variables based on the time it takes to complete each activity. The SMH Team’s workload model provides the most accurate analysis of each school’s needs.

The Role of School Psychologists

School psychologists are integral members of school-based multidisciplinary teams. They can help educators isolate student strengths and deficits, making targeted remediation possible. School psychologists also screen students who exhibit early warning indicators and collect data to determine the severity of students’ needs at the lower tiers of a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS). If concerns persist, school psychologists will complete psychological assessments to help school teams determine if students meet eligibility criteria for a disability classification for specialized instruction and related services.

The Role of Social Workers

Social workers are the only school-based mental health staff who are both licensed by the Department of Health (DOH) and the OSSE. They are trained to provide mental health evidenced-based treatments and practices to students and are best suited to provide behavior support services as prescribed on student’s 504 Plans and Individual Education Program. Social workers also complete social work assessments, functional behavior assessments (FBAs) and behavior intervention plans (BIPs) to help school teams make data-informed decisions related to modifying behavior.

Point of Contact

Kenya Coleman, Senior Director, School Mental Health, Kenya.Coleman@k12.dc.gov

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Afterschool Programming (21st Century Community Learning Center Grant)

Purpose

Afterschool programming provides affordable, safe, structured, and engaging academic, wellness, and enrichment programs that are open to all children in PK through 8th grades whose schools offer afterschool programming. These programs are designed to develop the whole child and are not solely focused on academics. This unique opportunity beyond the school day is provided by DCPS staff and community partners and is funded by local funds and a federal grant called the 21st Century Community Learning Center (21stCCLC) grant. This grant works to attain specific outcomes in attendance, academics, behavior improvement, family engagement, and partner engagement and as such, it supports schools’ goals. The 21stCCLC grant funds 5,610 students across 55 Title I schools. The combined grant and local funding funds programming for an average of 6,500 students annually.

OSSE awards DCPS the 21stCCLC grant for a period of three years and the overall annual award is a fixed amount per year. In developing the grant application, DCPS seeks to support Title I elementary schools and education campuses as well as two long-standing 21stCCLC middle school sites, unless the school has a pre-existing afterschool program or has opted not to become part of the cohort. The grant requires DCPS to fund specific activities in addition to daily programming, such as an external evaluator and professional development.

Requirements

  • Sufficient funds based on the number of seats designated by the Out of School Time Programming Team (OSTP) to pay a site leader (formerly known as the afterschool administrative aide), teachers, and paraprofessionals (formerly known as afterschool aides) for the year are loaded onto school budgets.
  • Staffing: The staffing model is based on 20 students: 1 teacher: 1 paraprofessional. No class should exceed 20 students.
    • Staffing plans must account for the entire personnel allocation and serve, at a minimum, the number of students identified by OSTP. The personnel allocation cannot be reprogrammed to non-personnel services.
    • OSTP will regularly monitor afterschool personnel expenditures to prevent over-spending.

Position

Requirement

Wage/hour

# hours per day

Note

Afterschool Site Leader (formerly Afterschool Administrative Aide)

Required unless there is a full- or part-time Afterschool Coordinator

$20/hour

3 hours per day

Manages daily operations of the program.

Teacher

Required

$40/hour

1 hour per day

See staffing model above.

Paraprofessional (aides)

Required

$16/hour

2.5 hours per day

See staffing model above.

  • Principals must work directly with OSTP coordinators or their full-time or part-time, school-based, afterschool coordinator, and Employee Services (HR) in managing the hiring process for afterschool administrative aides, teachers, and instructional/classroom aides.
    • Preference should be given to current DCPS employees. However, if there are not enough DCPS employees who are interested in working in afterschool programs, Principals should work with Employee Services to hire non-DCPS employees.
    • Schools must be fully staffed for the first day of afterschool programming.
    • At least one afterschool staff member must have taken Administration of Medication (AOM) training and be present from the end of the school day to 6:00 pm daily.
  • Hours: Afterschool programs meet Monday through Friday from the end of the school day to 6:15 pm.
    • Calendar: Afterschool programs begin on the first day of school. Parents and guardians receive this information during afterschool registration, but schools should also communicate the start date to parents and guardians. There is no afterschool programming on half days, parent-teacher conference days, canceled days (such as inclement weather days, “snow days”, etc.), teacher professional development days, or the day before the Thanksgiving and Winter breaks.
    • Grade levels: Afterschool programs must be offered to all grade levels present at the school.
    • Program: The afterschool program must contain both an academic and an enrichment portion.
    • Academic Power Hour (APH): Book club, academic support, and academic enrichment.
    • Enrichment: Uses a standard curriculum with monthly themes such as kindness, gratitude, social justice, STEM, and other topics.

How Funds Are Allocated

Within the overall 21stCCLC grant, DCPS determines the allocation of funding for features of the grant, such as staffing, supplies, professional development, evaluation, and partner contracts needed to fulfill grant activities. Schools served by the grant typically remain the same for the three-year period unless a school no longer has Title I status or opts out of programming.

After accounting for the above-required grant components, the number of students that can be served by the grant is based on:

  • The prior year’s afterschool enrollment and average daily attendance,
  • Demand for additional seats based on the waitlist, and
  • Capacity of School Program Providers to serve additional students.

Generally, the number of students to be served at each site remains the same for the three-year grant period unless one of those factors changes and additional seats can be funded within the overall grant award.

Menus of Options

Staffing

Afterschool Coordinator

  • Schools with larger enrollment or schools with significant afterschool programming can budget for a full- or part-time Afterschool Coordinator using their Afterschool Site Leader allocation along with flexible school budget funds.
  • These Coordinators adhere to the same OSTP policies and procedures that apply to OSTP Coordinators, including attending training and fulfilling 21stCCLC requirements (e.g., monitoring program quality, tracking student attendance, etc.).

PK3-PK4 Option

Since the cost of a teacher assigned to a group is the same as the paraprofessional, one option to be considered for grades PK3 and PK4 is to budget for two paraprofessionals instead of the teacher-para combination. This is not recommended outside of ECE.

Not Recommended

Hiring a part-time Afterschool Site Leader to oversee daily program operations. If the ASL is not dedicated solely to the afterschool program from the start to the end of the program period, program administration and quality suffer.

Programming

Principals may choose to supplement the OSTP afterschool allocation using flexible funds in their school budget allocation to expand or enrich the program. For example, a Principal may choose to extend teachers’ tours of duty, purchase additional resources, or hire their own full-time, school-based afterschool coordinator.

  • If a Principal is interested in using flexible funds (not the school’s afterschool allocation) to partner with an afterschool provider or community-based organization, please contact Thomasin Franken (franken@k12.dc.gov) in the Office of School Improvement and Supports.
  • OSTP encourages schools to develop and leverage partnerships with DCPS-reviewed School Program Providers (SPP’s) to provide high-quality academic and/or enrichment programming. Partners may be able to provide weekly specialized enrichment opportunities, such as dance classes or robotics. Additionally, as a community service, partners may use their own funding. Please refer to the School Partnerships section for additional guidance on working with school program providers.

Central Support

Financial

  • Schools with OSTP afterschool programs receive some centrally-procured supplies and materials to support afterschool programming using 21st CCLC grant funds. Schools do not need to budget for these supplies.
  • Funding for security until 6:30 pm each day is included in schools’ security allocation.

Non-Financial

  • Programs are supported by an OSTP Coordinator who monitors program quality and activity unless the school has hired its own full or part-time Afterschool Coordinator.
  • Professional development is provided to all afterschool staff before the opening of programming in August. Two additional events are offered in winter and spring of each year.
  • OSTP Coordinators actively seek to expand enrichment offerings at sites by engaging SPP’s that provide programming for free to students. Some enrichment partnerships are also funded by the 21CCLC grant.

Points of Contact

  • Margot Berkey, Specialist, Out of School Time Programs, Berkey@k12.dc.gov
  • Ross Mappes, Specialist, Budget and Grant Compliance, Ross.Mappes@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

Additional information on Afterschool can be found at dcps.dc.gov/afterschool, including a summary of the prior year’s program evaluation.


Reading Specialists and Reading Teachers

Purpose

Reading Specialists and Reading Teachers have expertise in diagnosing and responding to students having difficulty with reading or writing at all levels. They will be responsible for a caseload of approximately 25-30 students at a time. They will meet with students on varying schedules and group sizes, depending on students’ needs. They will also work collaboratively with classroom teachers to support Tier 1 and 2 instruction in the classroom (e.g., providing resources to support needs-based, small group instruction).

Reading Recovery®: Reading Recovery is a school-based, short-term, Tier 3 intervention of one-to-one tutoring for the lowest achieving first graders who are having the greatest difficulty learning to read and write. Selected Reading Recovery students are taught by a specially trained Reading Recovery teacher who delivers daily, individualized, 30-minute literacy lessons for 12-20 weeks. The goal is for students to reach grade level expectations and reduce the numbers of students referred to special education. Reading Recovery trained teachers use their expertise to support classroom teachers (e.g., theory and practice) and struggling students at all grade levels (Tier 1 and Tier 2).

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY22 the following schools receive a Title I-funded Reading Specialist or Reading Teacher:

  • W. Harris ES
  • Langley ES
  • Moten ES
  • Patterson ES
  • Stanton ES
  • Thomas ES

Schools may choose to budget for reading specialists or reading teachers. The cost of the position is at the average teacher salary cost.

Budgeting Recommendations

Personnel

  • New Reading Specialists must be hired out of a district-approved Reading Specialist candidate p The title of Reading Specialist is reserved for educators holding a Masters in Reading.
  • Schools wanting to hire an educator that does not hold a Masters in Reading for a reading intervention-type role should budget for a Reading Teacher.
  • For Reading Specialists/Teachers to become certified as Reading Recovery teachers, the school must apply for and be accepted into the Reading Recovery training cohort. Schools should contact Linda Randall (Randall@k12.dc.gov) to apply.

Non-Personnel

  • It is strongly recommended that all schools with a Reading Specialist or Reading Teacher allocate between $500 and $1,000 of educational supplies (agency object 204) or electronic learning (agency object 418) to purchase resources to support their intervention work. For guidance on suggested resources, please contact Moore3@k12.dc.gov
  • Schools planning to apply to the Reading Recovery cohort should budget an additional $300 in educational supplies to consumables to accompany the Reading Recovery kit teachers receive at the start of their train

Central Supports

Non-Financial

  • Reading Specialists are strongly encouraged to attend PD offered by the Office of Teaching and Learning.
  • Trained reading recovery teachers attend mandatory PD monthly during the workday and teachers in training attend a 6-credit graduate class outside of the workday. Both cohorts regularly observe live lessons and receive coaching visits.

Points of Contact

  • Reading Specialists – Emily Hammett, Director of Elementary ELA, Hammett@k12.dc.gov
  • Reading Recovery – Linda Randall, Director, 1st Grade Academy, Office of Elementary Schools, randall@k12.dc.gov

International Baccalaureate Programming

Program Purpose

DCPS continues to support International Baccalaureate (IB) programs across the school district to provide access to rigorous and internationally recognized academic programming. IB aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. IB schools receive ongoing, IB-accredited professional development in support of IB’s approach to teaching and learning, including developing students who are global-minded, critical thinkers.

Program Guidance

Requirements

The following chart describes staffing requirements for the authorized IB programs. These requirements are mandated by the International Baccalaureate Organization and are required for schools to maintain their IB World School status.

Program

PYP (Primary Years Programme)

MYP (Middle Years Programme Years 1-3)

MYP (Years 4-5)

DP (Diploma Programme)

Schools that are IB-authorized or expected to be authorized for SY 20-21

Shepherd ES
Thomson ES
Turner ES

Deal MS
Eliot-Hine MS

Eastern HS

Banneker HS
Eastern HS

IB Coordinator requirements

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

Classroom teacher requirements

Classroom teachers for all grade levels

Classroom teachers for all grade levels; all content areas

Teachers for each six groups of study

Teachers for each six groups of study

World Language/CAS requirement

At least 1.0 FTE World Language teacher

At least 2 World Language teachers (must service the whole school, the entire year)

At least two World Language teachers to service MYP

CAS Coordinator

Additional staffing requirement

Art Education: Physical, Art and Music teacher

Arts, Physical Education, Technology staff

Personal Project Coordinator

Extended Essay Supervisor

School Librarian requirement

School Librarian

School Librarian

N/A (Serviced by Diploma Programme)

School Librarian

Non-Personnel Services (NPS) Budget Allocations

Schools will receive an allocation line item “IB Funds.” This line is inclusive of the below chart and once budgets are submitted, the “IB Funds” will be moved into the appropriate budget lines based on the below spend plan.

The following chart describes what is funded in the “IB Funds” line allocated to schools.

* Procurement for this budget item is managed by Central Office on behalf of the school.

IB Budget Item

How Item is Allocated

*IB Certificate Renewal:
Required annually for IB schools

Each IB program has a different annual program fee. Allocated based on school IB program and IB fee schedule.

*Mid-Atlantic Association of IB World Schools Fee (IBMA):
Provides member benefits including access to professional development and IB coordinator network

Allocated equally to each school for their IBMA membership per the IBMA fee schedule.

*IB Professional Development:
Professional development for staff required by IB to maintain IB status.

Schools funds are allocated based on the number of IB programs they have, the number of IB students at a school, teacher turnover, and other PD requirement needs to maintain IB status.

*IB Authorization Visit:
Required evaluation for each IB program every 5 years.

Allocated to each school every five years (schedule varies by school) based on the IB fee schedule

IB Curricular Materials

Allocated equally for each IB program.

Diploma Programme only

How Item is Allocated

IB Exam Shipping Fees

Allocated to DP schools for shipping their exams. Allocated based on anticipated number of students who will be taking IB external assessments.

*Diploma Fees: IB student examination fees

Allocated to DP schools (Eastern and Banneker) based on historical data and predictions on the number of students who will take IB external exams.

Central Support

Financial

Based on available funds, the Office of Teaching and Learning may provide opportunities for NPS supports, such as teacher professional development for IB schools.

Non-Financial

The Office of Teaching and Learning provides direct support to IB schools, by serving as an intermediary between IB and the schools as needed, supporting procurement as IB’s central billing contact, and submitting IB requisitions for all schools. Additionally, the Office of Teaching and Learning supports the coordination and publicity of district-wide IB showcases and events.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

Schools can learn more about International Baccalaureate at https://www.ibo.org/.


DCPS Department of Athletics

Program Purpose

The District of Columbia Interscholastic Athletic Association (DCIAA) is committed to having a sound interscholastic athletic association. All public high schools, middle schools, and elementary schools within DCPS are eligible for membership in DCIAA. To be a DCIAA member school, schools must sponsor at least one athletic team.

DCPS will: (1) reinforce the concept that interscholastic athletics is a vital, integral part of the total school educational program; (2) emphasize standards of scholarship, sportsmanship, ethical conduct and amateurism; (3) promote and develop educational leadership, physical fitness, athletic excellence and sports participation; (4) initiate, stimulate, and conduct interscholastic athletic programs for student-athletes, and strive to promote equal opportunity to diverse populations and abilities interested in participating in the athletics programs.

Athletics is a vital, integral part of the total school educational program that promotes and supports student-athlete excellence within the school community.

Requirements

All athletic programs that participate in the DCIAA must meet the requirements of Title IX compliance.

How Funds Are Allocated

The high schools below are allocated a full time Athletics and Activities Coordinator:

SY21-22 Schools with Athletics and Activities Coordinator

Anacostia HS

Ballou HS

Banneker HS

Bard HS Early College

Cardozo EC

CHEC

Coolidge HS

Dunbar HS

Eastern HS

McKinley Tech HS

Phelps ACE HS

Ron Brown College Prep HS

Roosevelt HS

School Without Walls HS

Wilson HS

Woodson HS

The Athletics and Activities Coordinator position is an ET-10 position, which is a full-time position and therefore ineligible for extra duty pay or administrative premium.

Role of the Athletics and Activities Coordinator

At DCPS high schools, the Athletics and Activities Coordinator position is a full-time position. The Athletic and Activities Coordinator ensures that athletic programs, student clubs and other extracurricular activities operate efficiently. Additionally, the Coordinator manages the budget for extracurricular and athletics programs and oversees Title IX coordination and accountability at their school. Successful, robust athletic programs are guided by Athletic and Activities Coordinators that are available to handle the following day to day tasks (not an exhaustive list):

  • Student-athlete eligibility
  • Coach certification and coach pay
  • Manage team rosters in Athletics Tracking System
  • Prep and setup athletic facilities(stadiums/gymnasiums) for practices and contests
  • Uphold and effectively implement the rules and policies associated with the DCIAA
  • Coordinate and oversee equipment and uniform inventory
  • Manage athletic contests practices and events with appropriate personnel
  • Oversee scheduling for athletic teams and contests
  • Manages consolidation of contest gate receipts
  • Determines scheduling and formulates contracts for non-league athletic contests
  • Complete end of year modules for Title IX and athletic compliance reports

In addition to the administrative duties to keep the athletic program in compliance, athletic coordinators develop strategies for increased participation, support their coaches, are visible and available, and ensure a culture of sportsmanship, teamwork and scholarship are vital components of the athletic program.

Flexibilities

Given the dynamic role of the Athletics and Activity Coordinators, the Department of Athletics recommends Principals limit additional administrative and other school-based roles assigned to the Coordinator. In the past, Coordinators with many extra duties outside their scope faced challenges ensuring compliance with DCIAA requirements that affected the development of the athletic programs.

Athletic and Activity Programming at non-Allocated Schools

Opportunity Academy Athletic Coordinator

Opportunity Academy Athletic Coordinators continue to receive a stipend for their role in ensuring their school athletic programs operate efficiently. Through the DCIAA Athletic Extra Duty/Stipend pay process, the Department of Athletics pays the stipend for each Opportunity Academy Athletic Coordinator. Schools are not required to budget extra duty pay for their athletic programs.

Middle and Elementary School Athletic Coordinator

Athletic Coordinators at the middle and elementary levels receive stipends for their role in ensuring their school athletic programs operate efficiently. Through the Athletic Extra Duty/Stipend pay process, the Department of Athletics pays the stipend for each middle and elementary school Athletic Coordinator. Schools are not required to budget extra duty pay for their athletic programs.

Central Support

Financial

The DCPS Department of Athletics budget provides transportation for athletic teams, security at games, team uniforms, athletic equipment, coaches pay, game officials, non-DCPS competition venues, medical services, and championship awards.

Non-Financial

The DCPS Department of Athletics supports Athletic Directors through monthly meetings, providing professional development specific to the role the Athletic Director plays in establishing and guiding athletic operations within the school and supporting their coaches and athletic teams.

Points of Contact

Dwayne Foster, Executive Director of Athletics, Office of Secondary Schools, dwayne.foster@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

  • DCIAA Handbook: The DCIAA is an athletic conference governed by the rules in our handbook. Please read the DCIAA Athletics Handbookfor full rules and regulations. The handbook covers several policies including membership, student eligibility, non-league competitions, health and safety, sportsmanship, finances, and sanctions.
  • DCIAA Website

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