Building A Budget With Allocations - All Flexibility Levels

Level 1 Flexibility Allocations

SPED (Self-Contained)

In FY23 Special Education Self Contained teachers are Level 1, while Special Education Inclusion teachers are Level 2. To see the full Special Education Section (both Self Contained and Inclusion) please see the Level 2 Flexibility Section for Special Education.

 

Library Programs

Program Purpose:

DCPS continues to make significant investments in school library programs in the areas of culture of reading, technology applications, and online learning tools.  An effective school library program, implemented by a certified School Librarian has a direct and positive impact on student learning. 

Research shows that a strong library program is associated with a myriad of benefits to students, including increased achievement.  DCPS Librarians support MTSS through programming in STEM, research, digital citizenship, and media literacy, and a culture of reading and achievement throughout the school.

Librarians:

  • Support online learning by working with students and collaborating with teachers to leverage access to quality online reading materials
  • Serve as a school-based POC/Lead for educational technology resources: Canvas Sub-Account Administrator, Clever Tech Lead, school administrator for digital apps such as BrainPop.
  • Serve as the liaison between the school and DC Public Library
  • Are the reading champions of the school, fostering a culture of reading and engagement
  • Work directly with DCPS Educational Technology to coordinate access, solutions, and problem-solving for applications
  • Serve as the “Go-To” knowledge expert for the school, providing answers and/or recommendations to district-wide resources and best practices
  • Support “reluctant readers” through a variety of interest-based activities such as book clubs, book buddy programs, and individual reading conferences.

Requirements/Restrictions:

Personnel:

  • School Librarians must be licensed per the OSSE requirements for school Librarians.
  • All schools have been allocated at least a 1.0 Librarian which is non-petitionable.
  • The DCPS Library Programs team interviews all applicants to create a pool from which principals must select. The team works with schools to match candidates to schools. 

Non-Personnel:

  • From every school’s Total Non-Personnel Allocation, $22/student is locked as Library Funds for the DCPL MOU and electronic library services.
  • These funds are earmarked for library reading materials. Central Library Programs will collect these specific funds from each school budget account to meet MOU requires to provide equitable library and digital resources across the district.

How Funds Are Allocated:

All schools are allocated funding for 1.0 Librarian. Due to building and library configuration, CHEC and Oyster-Adams are allocated funding for 2.0 Librarians.   Schools are also allocated a literacy budget of at least $20/student for library materials to maintain the MOU partnership with DC Public Library for electronic and hard copies of books and reading subscriptions.

Budgeting Recommendations:

Align support for the school library with additional staffing as per personnel recommendation above.  Provide funding to include needed supplies and technology resources for the library for student and staff engagement.

  • Schools with more than 600 students should budget a library tech aid to support the school library program
  • Schools with more than 1000 students should allocate a second school Librarian position to support the school library program
  • Recommended NPS for library supplies: School Librarians will need to secure specialty supplies to process donated books and make repairs to the library collection. Recommended supplies may include:
    • Follett Destiny Barcode labels available from Follett School Solution
    • Clear Waterproof Labels for Protecting Barcodes
    • Bookends, 6 inches in height, heavy duty, multiple quantities
    • Vinyl Label Protectors, Round, 1-1/2 x 2 Inches to cover book spine labels, multiple quantities
    • Single- or double-sided book cart
    • Book Binding Repair Tape, variety of colors, 2-Inch by 15-Yard, Cloth Library
    • Book Hinging Repair Tape, Acid Free and Archival Safe
    • Book display stands
    • Library Signage
    • Folding book jacket covers in various sizes
    • Scotch Book Tape, 2.83 in. x 15 yd or longer to repair paperback books
  • Recommended Technology
    • Replace out-of-life-cycle library desk main computer with new laptop or desktop station
    • Replace or order a second handheld Follett Barcode Scanner from Follett School Solutions to support the option to create a self-checkout station at the library desk
  • Funds for the library should not be taken from arts, music, or world language programs
  • Scheduling recommendations and sample schedules can be found on Academic and Creative Empowerment Planning SharePoint

Role of the Librarian

The School Librarian empowers and develops every student through a strong schoolwide culture of reading, information literacy, and technology fluency. The School Librarian is expected to be a collaborative instructional partner with every teacher. The School Librarian should also be an integral part of the school leadership team to develop a library program that is responsive to and supportive of school goals. The School Librarian is to be an effective program administrator, developing and managing the library collection and library programs to support student learning. To achieve this and to provide equitable access to library resources and instructional partnership, the School Librarian should have a flexible schedule and cannot be a teacher of record for any course. During SY20-21, schools with a designated Librarian professional or library aide staff member saw significantly higher utilization of district offered electronic eBooks.

Full time 1.0 School Librarian:

  • Supports online learning by working with students and collaborating with teachers to leverage access to quality online reading materials, serves as a school-based lead for Canvas, Clever, BrainPop, SORA, OverDrive, etc.
  • Serves as the liaison between the school and the DC Public Library
  • Engages students and staff in research skills development, digital citizenship, and information literacy strategies
  • Fosters a culture of reading and engagement
  • Works directly with DCPS Educational Technology to coordinate access, solutions, and problem-solving for application
  • Serves as the “Go To” knowledge expert for the school, providing answers and/or recommendations to district-wide resources and best practices
  • Curates and facilitates the use of knowledge database(s) to support engagement with students and staff

Central Support

Non-Financial

  • Library Programs team handles the procurement of the library materials on behalf of schools via MOU requirements.
  • Library Programs provide monthly PD meetings for School Librarian and support staff
  • Library Programs team provides collection development support through analysis and recommendations for the library collection using computer-based reporting

Points of Contact

  • Kevin M. Washburn – Director, Library Programs – ACE/OTL,  Kevin.Washburn@k12.dc.gov, 202-680-2842
  • Karen Cole – Deputy Chief, Academic and Creative Empowerment – OTL, Karen.Cole@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

Title I Parental Involvement 

Title I Parental Involvement is a Level 1 Allocation wile Title I Schoolwide is a Level 3 Allocation. Please see the Level 3 Flexibility Section to read about both Title I funds.  

 

Title II PD

How Title Funds are Allocated at Non-Title I Schools: 

Non-Title I Schools receive a per pupil allocation of Title II funding to be used for professional development. These funds are supplemental grant dollars which cannot be combined with local funds. For this reason, the Title II allocation is a Level 1 flexibility and locked into professional development. Schools work with their federal programs and grants team point of contact to spend funds on allowable goods/services throughout the year.  

Purpose 

Title II, Professional Development 

Title II, Part A funds may be used to support professional development activities as described by Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Funds may be used to provide training for teachers who have participated in professional development activities to ensure that the knowledge and skills learned by teachers are implemented in the classroom. 

Non-Title I schools must use the following guidelines when developing their Title II professional development plan and budget: 

Title II funds for professional development can include teachers of every subject as well as all other school staff, from Principals to librarians to paraprofessionals. It also recognizes that educators learn best when they can collaborate and immediately apply what they learn by explicitly requiring ongoing job-embedded activities that improve instruction.

Title II, Programmatic Guidelines 

Title II funds must be used to provide quality, sustained professional development staff/services that:  

  • Are intensive and yield a positive and lasting impact on classroom instruction and teachers’ performance.
  • Are short-term workshops or conferences, supported with a sustainability plan articulated and approved in their Comprehensive School Plan.
  • Improve and increase teachers’ knowledge of subjects they teach, to include but not limited to, English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign language, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography, and health and physical education courses.
  • Are an integral part of a school-wide improvement plan.
  • Give teachers, Principals, and administrators the knowledge and skills to provide students with the opportunity to meet challenging content and performance standards.
  • Improve classroom management skills.
  • Support training of highly effective teachers.
  • Advance teacher understanding of effective instructional strategies that are based on scientifically-based research and include strategies for improving academic performance.
  • Are aligned with and directly related to the content standards.
  • Are developed with extensive participation of teachers, Principals, parents, and administrators. 
  • Are regularly evaluated for their impact on increasing teacher effectiveness and improving student academic achievement.

Other allowable uses 

  • Provide training for teachers and Principals in the use of technology used to improve teaching and learning in academic subjects in which the teachers teach.
  • Provide training to incorporate technology that enhances classroom instruction.
  • Provide instruction in methods of teaching children with special needs.
  • Provide instruction in the use of data and assessments to inform and instruct classroom practice.
  • Attend conferences that are supported with a sustainability plan to ensure that essential information and strategies will have a lasting impact on classroom instruction.
  • Payment of professional development activities that may include tuition and employee training to improve classroom instruction and/or teacher performance.

Non-allowable uses  

  • Provide direct services to students and parents.
  • Purchase educational supplies, materials or equipment for student use; or
  • Construct facilities.

Points of Contact 

Pool Programming

Purpose 

The ability to swim is an important life skill that should be afforded to as many students as possible. Some schools have athletic facilities that include pools, as follows. The following information applies to the below schools:

  • Ballou HS 
  • Cardozo HS 
  • Dunbar HS 
  • Marie Reed ES
  • Roosevelt HS 
  • Woodson HS

Staffing (Personnel Services)

DCPS partners with the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) to manage the safety and operations of the pools. Through this partnership, DPR will hire and staff pool managers and lifeguards. Schools that receive these funds will only be responsible for hiring a full-time certified Health and Physical Education teacher with a Water Safety Instructor’s endorsement. 

Allocation and Budgeting (Non-Personnel Services)

  • Schools will be allocated $5,000 in supply funds for pool supplies. These funds should be budgeted into Recreation supplies/materials and used by the school to purchase the supplies and materials needed for swimming instruction.
  • Schools will receive $140,940.74 (Marie Reed $97,600.08) for the DPR Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreement. These funds are locked into contractual services as part of the MOU. 

Flexibilities and Restrictions

Pool supply funds may only be used to support swimming instruction. 

Health and PE teachers who teach swimming courses should only teach swimming courses and should not be asked to teach other PE courses. The Pool Health and PE teacher can teach PE2 students during their swim unit.

Elementary Expansion Swim Program

Students from the below 40 schools will travel to nearby pools for swim instruction. Funds for this program are allocated to the schools exclusively to support the program.

SY22-23 Schools Participating in Elementary Expansion

Aiton ES

Beers ES

Burrville ES

CW Harris ES

Drew ES

Excel Academy

Garfield ES

Hendley ES

Ketcham ES

King ES

Malcolm X ES

Randle Highlands ES

Simon ES

Thomas ES

Turner ES

Van Ness ES

Barnard ES

Brightwood ES

Browne EC

Burroughs

Capitol Hill Montessori EC

Cleveland ES

Cooke ES
Dorothy Height ES
Garrison ES
LaSalle Backus ES
Leckie EC

John Lewis ES

Ludlow-Taylor ES

Noyes ES

Patterson ES

Payne ES

Raymond EC

Ross ES

Seaton ES

SWWFS EC

Tyler ES

Walker-Jones EC

Wheatley ES

Whittier ES

Participating schools will be allocated funding to support the program for the following items, to be shared across the 40 schools and managed by the Health and PE team in the Office of Teaching and Learning:

  • ET-15 PE Aquatics teacher
  • Aquatics specialist
  • Transportation funding
  • Supply money
    • Swimming equipment* (extra swimsuits, goggles, swim caps, and towels)
    • Instructional materials (kickboards, buoys, noodles, etc.)

These funds cannot be repurposed to support any other programs or positions. DPR will provide lifeguard and pool operator staffing at their pool sites. Participating schools must have one teacher to assist in the pool during instruction.

Points of Contact 

  • Miriam Kenyon, Director, Health and Physical Education, Miriam.Kenyon@k12.dc.gov
  • DPR Point of Contact: DPR Aquatics Division, 202.671.1289

Credit Recovery

Program Purpose

Credit recovery is an alternative to course repetition for students who have previously failed a course required for high school graduation. Credit recovery targets the course standards in which students are deficient and allows students to work through the content in self-paced, competency-based manner. All high school students who fail a course required for graduation (DCPS 24-CU diploma) may be considered for enrollment in credit recovery. Credit recovery allows students an opportunity to earn course credit by demonstrating mastery of content at the same level of rigor as the original course, consistent with DCPS curriculum. This allows students who fail a graduation required course to continue to stay on-track or get back on-track for a timely graduation.

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY23, a total of 16 schools will receive Credit Recovery funds as a program grant. Funding allocations are based on size of school, number of failures and anticipated course recovery needs, and program and funding usage during the prior year.

Credit recovery programming is formally offered and funded at the following schools:

Anacostia HS

Coolidge HS

Roosevelt HS

Ballou HS

Dunbar HS

Phelps HS

Columbia Heights EC

Eastern HS

Ron Brown College Prep HS

Bard Early College HS

Woodson HS

Wilson HS

Cardozo HS

Opportunity Academies – Ballou STAY, Luke C. Moore, Roosevelt STAY – will receive credit recovery funding as well. They do not offer credit recovery classes, but have flexibility to use these funds to support other forms of academic recovery. If students need credit recovery courses, but attend a school that does not offer programming, those students can cross-enroll in an available program at another school upon approval form that program’s coordinator and applicable teacher.

  • In some limited instances, schools without formal credit recovery programming can offer credit recovery programming if there is a student need but must fund it with their own admin premium. A program proposal must be submitted and approved by central office (SASS and Student Engagement offices).

Requirements and Staffing Guidance:

The credit recovery budget allows schools to provide administrative premium to compensate credit recovery teachers. Instruction can take place after school or before school, and students must attend a minimum of three sessions per week. Student enrollment can take place on an ongoing basis throughout the year, and students should be awarded a grade and withdrawn from credit recovery once they complete all required elements of the course, rather than at a pre-determined interval. As this allocation is connected to DCPS Graduation Requirements, funds must be exclusively used for supporting credit recovery.

The default staffing model for DCPS credit recovery courses shall be as follows:

  • Credit recovery classrooms shall be staffed by teachers certified in relevant content area(s).
  • Credit recovery classrooms may contain students who are working on different courses, provided that the teacher is certified to instruct across all courses within her/his classroom.
  • The teacher to student ratio should not exceed 1:15 in credit recovery classes, if the teacher is teaching up to two courses at the same time. Teachers may be responsible for teaching up to three courses at a time but may only serve a total of 30 students across the three courses.
  • Credit recovery teachers are compensated $40/hour in administrative premium and should be provided 30 minutes of paid planning time for every three hours of teaching time.
  • An administrator and security must remain on site during credit recovery program hours.
  • Each high school will develop its own schedule for credit recovery courses and submit that schedule to the graduation excellence division for approval.
  • Each school should designate a staff member to coordinate credit recovery and monitor the program (see Menus of Options for staffing suggestions).

Budgeting/Spending Recommendations

Since credit recovery programming has ongoing entry and is self-paced, the length of each class is difficult to determine; however, schools should anticipate that most courses will operate for at least three terms. The table below details the cost (per teacher) for several different scenarios. Please note, the numbers below are estimates and may vary slightly based on the total days in each term, length of course, etc.

Minutes/day

Days per week

Planning time (Hrs)

Length (weeks)

Admin Premium

Cost

60

4

0.5

36

$40

$6,480

90

4

1

36

$40

$10,080

120

4

1.5

36

$40

$13,680

180

4

2

36

$40

$20,160

Schools should create a plan for credit recovery at the beginning of the year to determine which courses they are able to offer. This plan should be based on student need, teacher availability, and number of courses they can afford within their budget allocation.  

Menus of Options

Schools have the following scheduling and staffing flexibilities:

  • Length of Class: It is recommended that credit recovery courses take place for 60 – 120 minutes per day.
  • Classes per week: Classes can meet three to five days each week. It is recommended that classes meet at least four days each week.
  • Multiple teachers: School can choose to hire multiple teachers to co-teach a course. Depending on budget and student need, a school could have two full teachers for the course, or the teachers could “split” a class (e.g., each teacher teaches two days per week).
  • Teacher aides: Schools also have the option to hire an aide (e.g., EL teacher or SPED support) to provide targeted support to students as needed.
  • Courses per Teacher: One teacher can teach multiple courses within the same content area.
  • Program Coordination: It is highly recommended that each school have a designated staff member to monitor and coordinate the program. This can be a teacher, administrator, Pathways Coordinator, or other support staff.
    • If the coordinator is a WTU member, and is supporting credit recovery outside of, or in addition their tour of duty hours, they are eligible to earn Admin Premium.
    • If the coordinator is not a WTU member, they should work with their Administrator to create a flexible schedule to ensure they are not working excessive hours.
  • Principals may supplement their credit recovery allocation by using additional administrative premium funds to expand or improve the program, such as hiring additional staff or purchasing additional resources.  

Central Support

Central Office provides BOY teacher training and professional development opportunities for Program Coordinators monthly during the school year. Credit recovery coordinators are also included on relevant Central Office newsletters (e.g., College Prep, Counseling Weekly).

Points of Contact

Shemia Anderson, Manager Graduation, Office of Secondary Schools, shemia.anderson@k12.dc.gov 

Liz Wiemers (currently on leave), Director of Student Engagement, Graduation Excellence, Office of Secondary Schools, Elizabeth.Wiemers@k12.dc.gov

 

Helpful Resources

DCPS Credit Recovery Policy

 

NAF 

NAF – Program Purpose

DCPS currently has 21 NAF Academies (formerly known as National Academy Foundation) across 11 schools. The academy model is embedded with strong college and industry partnerships, internships, and rigorous curricula that culminate in industry-recognized certifications. All Academies are supported by Industry Advisory Boards whose members include local business leaders.

NAF Academies may receive funding support from both the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins) grant and the DC Career Academy Network (DC CAN) grant. Please refer to the “Career Education- Perkins Grant Supported” section of the Guide for relevant information.

Program Guidance

Requirements

OSSE requires NAF Academies to have a Director (NAF Academy Director, ET-6). Multiple Academies within the same school may share a Director, per the College and Career Programs Division’s approval. In some cases, the Director positions are funded externally (DC CAN or other grant) for the first two years, after which point the unit cost of a position will be added to school’s budget as part of their allocation to cover the Director position. These positions are required to ensure sustainability of the program, and Principals must use the funds as allocated.

The College and Career Programs Division requires NAF Academies to have Career Technical Education teachers (CTE Teacher, ET-15, unless otherwise noted) to sustain a quality program and schedule to required course offerings, as determined by a school’s master schedule. NAF Academy program requirements are as follows:

  • Students participate in 3-4 themed courses in sequence as well as take certain core academic classes in cohorts, at times determined by a school’s master schedule.
  • Programs start on the first day of school and end on the last full day of the school year.
  • NAF Academies are offered to high school students in grades 9ththrough 12th; schools determine if students begin their NAF Academy experiences and coursework in either 9th or 10th
  • The curriculum for the 3-4 themed courses is determined by the theme of the Academy (e.g., Engineering, IT, Health Sciences, Hospitality).

How Funds Are Allocated

Personnel

All NAF related positions NAF Directors (ET-6), NAF Academy Managers (ET-8) and/or NAF Academy Coordinators (ET-10) are allocated and pre-loaded onto school budgets in the budgeting application based on advisory of the College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools and consultation with school leaders.

Non-Personnel

All Academies will have access to OSSE DC CAN Academy Activity Funds through central services (CTE Department); the amount Academies receive will vary based on Academy outcomes and compliance. These funds may be spent on supplies, professional development, equipment, marketing, and activities intended to support the success of students in the program. DC CAN grant funds are managed and controlled by the District’s CTE Director.

Career Academies are also eligible to receive Perkins grant funds: See “Career Education- Perkins Grant Supported” section of the Guide for relevant information.

Menus of Options

Assistant Principal – If schools wish to have an Assistant Principal over the Academy, Principals should contact the College and Career Programs Division to discuss this option. To budget for the position, Principals should submit a petition and use flexible funding on to budget for the increased cost above the NAF Academy Director role. Unlike NAF Directors, Assistant Principals have evaluative authority and are required to hold OSSE Administrative licensure. As there is no specific AP-NAF Academy position, Principals should select the appropriate Assistant Principal position that fits their program. This Assistant Principal should primarily oversee the NAF Academy.

Central Support

Financial

Utilizing the centrally managed Perkins grants, the College and Career Programs Division supports the purchasing of supplies, professional development, equipment, marketing, and activities intended to support the success of students in the program. Requested Non-Personnel Services Funds must be spent on allowable uses according to Perkins Grant.

Non-Financial

The College and Career Programs Division at Central supports operations and implementation of Career Education programs, including but not limited to data collection and feedback reporting, professional learning and development, and management coaching and training. Additionally, they provide budget management and support to meet annual funding goals.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

DCPS CTE Website

Ninth Grade Academy

NGA – Program Purpose

Ninth grade academies nurture first-year ninth grade students, so they transition successfully to high school, promotion, graduation, college, and career. Progress and results are measured by the following student outcomes:

  • On-track to promote rates each term and final promotion rates after summer school of each year.
  • School attendance as measured by an average in-seat attendance rate.
  • Student conduct and behavior as evidenced by the number of student suspensions and in active student engagement in academic tasks.

Effective Ninth Grade Academies in DCPS provide rich, responsive, and well-rounded educational experiences for students transitioning from eighth grade to succeed in ninth grade and beyond. Personalized instruction ensures that students have meaningful reasons to engage in school and that they experience energetic learning and work toward their individual and shared goals for future studies and careers. Successful Academies have strong student to adult connections, clear expectations of all facets of schooling create, and maintain a high-quality learning environment. The participating schools are Anacostia, Ballou, Cardozo, Coolidge, Eastern, Dunbar, Ron Brown, Roosevelt, and Woodson High Schools.

Program Guidance

Requirements

  • The Ninth Grade Academy program is subject to terms of the Title I grant which funds it.
  • Academy APs must be fully dedicated to academy implementation with additional duties as time permits.
  • Academy money must go directly to support academy students, teachers, and staff, and spend plans must meet the terms of the Title I grant.
  • DCPS offers this program as a strategy to increase the number of ninth graders who graduate from high school in four years. The schools that currently have this program – Anacostia, Ballou, Cardozo, Coolidge, Eastern, Dunbar, Ron Brown, Roosevelt, and Woodson High Schools – have a demonstrated need in this area.

NGA students are first-time 9th grade students who are registered in English 1 in the current school year. English 1 and at least 6 credits are required for promotion to the 10th grade and for graduation. “First-time 9th grade student” is defined as a student whose first 9th grade year is the current school year. Students receiving special education services with 20+ hours on their IEPs who are in self-contained classrooms and EL level 1 students are excluded.

How Funds Are Allocated

Every school is allocated an Assistant Principal to oversee academy operations, evaluate staff, and support students. Additionally, each academy is allocated a specific amount of administrative premium and non-personnel dollars relative to their size to fund academy operations and activities.

Menus of Options (Flexibilities)

Ninth Grade Academies spend their funds according to spend plans they create annually. There are no changes schools can make to allocations during the budget development process. However, adjustments can be made throughout the year as each academy AP works with the NGA central coordinator to reprogram funds to where they foresee the most need and based on where the school spent the most money the previous fiscal year. See the spending guidance included in helpful resources for more information.

Central Support

Financial

Each academy is allocated their own NPS and PS funds from the Title I grant. No additional financial support from central is provided.

Non-Financial

The Director of Ninth Grade Academies leads on-going, job-embedded professional development for ninth grade academy APs focusing on: leadership, facilitation skills, feedback to teachers, instructional practices, student engagement, cultural competence, DCPS curriculum and assessments, consistent grading practices, an assignment/point recovery model, and routine analysis of all data used to measure student progress.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

JROTC

Program Purpose

Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AJROTC) or Navy JROTC (collectively, “JROTC”) is a dynamic, challenging, and rewarding leadership development program based on the principles of performance-based, learner-centered education that promotes development of core abilities: capacity for life-long learning, communication, responsibility for actions and choices, good citizenship, respectful treatment of others, conflict resolution, and critical thinking techniques.

Program Guidance

Requirements

In the agreement between DCPS and the Department of Defense, JROTC programs must be staffed with two instructors:

  • Senior Instructor (Teacher – JROTC Department Chairman) who is a commissioned officer; and
  • Instructor who is a non-commissioned officer (Teacher – JROTC Instructor).

Unless otherwise noted, both Instructors must be ET-15 positions.

If a JROTC program has had two consecutive years with enrollment greater than 150 students, a third Instructor may be added in the third year, pending approval from DCPS and appropriate branch of US Military.

How Funds Are Allocated

The JROTC instructor’s salary is funded through a cost-sharing agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense unless the program is classified as an NDCC (National Defense Cadet Corps) program. DCPS schools pay the equivalent of a full-time position and the Department of Defense reimbursees per the cost-share agreement.

Under the advisory of the College and Career Programs Division in the Office of Secondary Schools and consultation with school leaders, JROTC Instructors will be pre-populated in your budget. This position cannot be removed without loss of funding.

Central Support

Financial

Central provides limited support for physical training uniforms and the City-Wide Dining Out event.

Non-Financial

The JROTC team within Central provides curriculum, teacher support, and IT equipment for JROTC classrooms. The JROTC team also leads the JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge Summer Camp which is available to JROTC students based on availability.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

International Baccalaureate (IB)

Program Purpose

DCPS continues to support International Baccalaureate (IB) programs across the school district to provide access to rigorous and internationally recognized academic programming. IB aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. IB schools receive ongoing, IB-accredited professional development in support of IB’s approach to teaching and learning, including developing students who are global-minded, critical thinkers.

Program Guidance

Requirements

The following chart describes staffing requirements for the authorized IB programs. These requirements are mandated by the International Baccalaureate Organization and are required for schools to maintain their IB World School status.

Program

PYP (Primary Years Programme)

MYP (Middle Years Programme Years 1-3)

MYP (Years 4-5)

DP (Diploma Programme)

Schools that are IB-authorized or expected to be authorized for SY 21-212

Shepherd ES
Thomson ES
Turner ES

Deal MS
Eliot-Hine MS

Eastern HS

Banneker HS
Eastern HS

IB Coordinator requirements

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

IB Coordinator
(ET-10 or higher)

Classroom teacher requirements

Classroom teachers for all grade levels

Classroom teachers for all grade levels; all content areas

Teachers for each six groups of study

Teachers for each six groups of study

World Language/CAS requirement

At least 1.0 FTE World Language teacher

At least 2 World Language teachers (must service the whole school, the entire year)

At least two World Language teachers to service MYP

CAS Coordinator

Additional staffing requirement

Art Education: Physical, Art and Music teacher

Arts, Physical Education, Technology staff

Personal Project Coordinator

Extended Essay Supervisor

School Librarian requirement

School Librarian

School Librarian

N/A (Serviced by Diploma Programme)

School Librarian

Non-Personnel Services (NPS) Budget Allocations

Schools will receive an allocation line item “IB Funds.” This line is inclusive of the chart below and once budgets are submitted, the “IB Funds” will be moved into the appropriate budget lines by the school budgeting team based on the below spend plan.

The following chart describes what is funded in the “IB Funds” line allocated to schools.

* Procurement for this budget item is managed by Central Office on behalf of the school.

IB Budget Item

How Item is Allocated

*IB Certificate Renewal:
Required annually for IB schools

Each IB program has a different annual program fee. Allocated based on school IB program and IB fee schedule.

*Mid-Atlantic Association of IB World Schools Fee (IBMA):
Provides member benefits including access to professional development and IB coordinator network

Allocated equally to each school for their IBMA membership per the IBMA fee schedule.

*IB Professional Development:
Professional development for staff required by IB to maintain IB status.

Schools funds are allocated based on the number of IB programs they have, the number of IB students at a school, teacher turnover, and other PD requirement needs to maintain IB status.

*IB Authorization Visit:
Required evaluation for each IB program every 5 years.

Allocated to each school every five years (schedule varies by school) based on the IB fee schedule

IB Curricular Materials

Allocated equally for each IB program.

IB Budget Item

How Item is Allocated

*IB Certificate Renewal:
Required annually for IB schools

Each IB program has a different annual program fee. Allocated based on school IB program and IB fee schedule.

*Mid-Atlantic Association of IB World Schools Fee (IBMA):
Provides member benefits including access to professional development and IB coordinator network

Allocated equally to each school for their IBMA membership per the IBMA fee schedule.

*IB Professional Development:
Professional development for staff required by IB to maintain IB status.

Schools funds are allocated based on the number of IB programs they have, the number of IB students at a school, teacher turnover, and other PD requirement needs to maintain IB status.

*IB Authorization Visit:
Required evaluation for each IB program every 5 years.

Allocated to each school every five years (schedule varies by school) based on the IB fee schedule

IB Curricular Materials

Allocated equally for each IB program.

Central Support

Financial

Based on available funds, the Office of Teaching and Learning may provide opportunities for NPS supports, such as teacher professional development for IB schools.

Non-Financial

The Office of Teaching and Learning provides direct support to IB schools, by serving as an intermediary between IB and the schools as needed, supporting procurement as IB’s central billing contact, and submitting IB requisitions for all schools. Additionally, the Office of Teaching and Learning supports the coordination and publicity of district-wide IB showcases and events.

Points of Contact

Helpful Resources

Schools can learn more about International Baccalaureate at https://www.ibo.org/.

 

 

Twilight

Program Purpose

Through the provision of Title I funding, the Twilight program offers opportunities for students to participate in original credit courses outside of the traditional school day at selected high schools. The Twilight program allows students who are behind in original course credits  to get back on a timely path to graduation by providing more flexibility in scheduling and completing courses. Twilight classes are taken in addition to, and not in place of, a full schedule taken during the traditional school day. This means that any students enrolled in Twilight courses must also be enrolled in a full schedule during the traditional day. All students who need to earn one or more original credits to get on-track for graduation may be considered for enrollment in Twilight. Twilight cannot be used to accelerate the academic progress of a student who is on-track to graduate. Students earn original credits by meeting the required seat hours and successfully completing assignments, assessments, and expectations consistent with DCPS curriculum.

Allocation Guidance

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY23, Twilight programming will be offered at all Title I comprehensive high schools. In some instances, students can cross-enroll in a Twilight program at another school if programming is not available at their home school. On a limited basis, and with approval from central office, schools are able to offer virtual Twilight classes as well.

SY22-23 High Schools with Twilight funding

Anacostia

Dunbar

Ballou

Eastern

Cardozo

Roosevelt

Columbia Heights

Ron Brown

Coolidge

Woodson

The exact amount of funding available to each school is determined based on past finding useage and projected student need. Typically, schools receive a similar allocation year to year. However, since the overall grant funding is spread across all participating schools, there can be shifts to allocations if schools use significantly more or less of the allocation.

Restrictions

Twilight programing is funded by Title I funding and all funds must be exclusively used to compensate time spent in direct support of Twilight programming. A designated Twilight Coordinator or other designated staff member should track teacher time and must certify that all time billed to the Twilight fund was completed in service of Twilight programming.

Budgeting/Spending Recommendations

On average, a Twilight teacher position costs about $6,200 per 1-credit course. This includes 120+ hours of instruction, plus planning time. Full credit courses can be scheduled across 1, 2, or 4 terms and should align with the start and end dates of the term(s). A half (.5) credit costs roughly $3,000 and can be scheduled across one or two terms. For more detailed information on cost please see the table below. Please note the numbers below are estimates and may vary slightly based on the total instructional days in each term.

Course credit

Length of course

Instructional hours / week

Planning per week

Admin Premium

# of weeks

Cost per class

1

1 term

15

2.5

$40/hour

9

$6,300

1

2 terms

7.5

1

$40/hour

18

$6,120

1

4 terms

3.75

0.5

$40/hour

36

$6,120

0.5

1 term

7.5

1

$40/hour

9

$3,060

0.5

2 terms

3.75

0.5

$40/hour

18

$6,120

Twilight funding operates on the Fiscal Year timeline; schools that anticipate offering TW courses in term 1 of the following school year should ensure that they maintain ample funding in their budget to support programming through October 1.

Staffing Requirements and Menus of Options

School schedules and staffing will vary across schools. Schools have the flexibility to create a schedule that best addresses the needs of their students and accommodate teacher availability within their budget.

Each high school will develop its own schedule for Twilight courses based on the guidance below.

Twilight classes can be scheduled across one, two, or four terms. Course schedules and student enrollment should align with the start and end date of the term(s). Courses must be scheduled in such a way that students are able meet the minimum seat hour requirement – 60 hours (for a .5 credit course) or 120 hours (for a 1-credit course) – and must be staffed by a certified teacher.

  • Twilight classrooms shall be staffed by a teacher certified in relevant content area.
  • Teachers can only teach one Twilight course during a scheduled time block and may not combine courses; teachers are able to teach two separate sections of Twilight during the day (e.g., block 5 and block 6)
  • Full (1.0) credit courses can be offered across 1, 2, or 4 terms and can begin in any term.
  • Half (.5) credit courses can be offered across 1 or 2 terms and can begin in any term.
  • The teacher to student ratio should not exceed 1:15.
  • Twilight teachers are compensated $40/hour in administrative premium and should be provided 30 minutes of paid planning time for every three hours of teaching time to Twilight students that occurs outside of normal school hours.
  • An administrator and security must remain on site during Twilight program hours.
  • Students can cross-enroll and participate in Twilight programming at other schools, including virtual classes.
  • It is recommended that schools designate a Twilight coordinator to oversee the program, such as the Pathways Coordinator, Counselor, or other student support team member.
  • It is not recommended that schools staff a Twilight course with more than one full time content teacher. If necessary, full, or part-time support staff can be hired to support EL students of students with IEPs.
  • Principals may supplement their Twilight allocation by using additional administrative premium funds from their own budget to expand or improve the program.
  • Twilight funds cannot be used for any other purpose. If schools feel that they will not use their entire Twilight budget or think they may require additional budget to fully fund the program, they should reach out to the Central Office POC to determine if reallocation is possible.

Schools should closely examine their student data at the beginning of the year and use the guiding questions below to help determine which courses they should offer via Twilight each year:

  • How many students at the school need the course?
  • Are there any potential graduates who need the course to graduate this year?
  • Of the students who need the course, can any or all of them be scheduled to take the course during the regular school day without disrupting their schedule?
  • Is another school offering the course in Twilight, where students could cross-enroll?

Schools should prioritize courses with a high student need, as well as any courses needed by student(s) for graduation that cannot be taken at another school or during the school day.

Central Support

Central Office will support schools in monitoring teacher hours and submitting appropriate documentation of time worked per the Title I guidance. This will include providing coordinators with a timesheet for monitoring staff hours, an Admin Premium memo, monthly reminders for documentation submission, and monitoring of submissions with individual follow-up as needed.

Point of Contact

Liz Wiemers, Director, Student Engagement, Graduation Excellence, Office of Secondary Schools, Elizabeth.Wiemers@k12.dc.gov

Helpful Resources

Twilight Program Overview

 

Title I Reading Teachers and Specialists

Purpose

Reading Specialists have expertise in diagnosing and responding to students having difficulty with reading or writing at all levels. They are responsible for a caseload of approximately 25-30 students at a time. Reading specialists meet with students on varying schedules and group sizes, depending on students’ needs. They also work collaboratively with classroom teachers and LEAP Leaders to support Tier 1 and 2 instruction in the classroom (e.g., collaboratively reviewing student data, providing resources to support needs-based, small group instruction).

*Schools that identify an educator that does not meet DCPS’s qualifications (see Budget Recommendations) for a Reading Specialist can leverage educators’ knowledgeable in the cognitive science of reading research as a Reading Teacher.

Educators trained as Reading Recovery Teachers can be budgeted either as a reading specialist or a reading teacher based on their qualifications.

How Funds Are Allocated

In FY23 the following schools receive a Title I-funded Reading Specialist or Reading Teacher:

  • C.W. Harris ES
  • Langley ES
  • Moten ES
  • Patterson ES
  • Stanton ES
  • Thomas ES

Schools may choose to budget for a Reading Specialist or Reading Teacher. The cost of the position is at the average teacher salary cost.

Budgeting Recommendations

Personnel

  • New Reading Specialists must be hired out of a district-approved Reading Specialist candidate pool. The title of Reading Specialist is reserved for educators holding a master’s degree in Reading.
  • Schools wanting to hire an educator that does not hold a master’s degree in Reading for a reading intervention-type role should budget for a Reading Teacher.

Non-Personnel

  • It is strongly recommended that all schools with a Reading Specialist or Reading Teacher budget between $500 and $1,000 of educational supplies (agency object 204) or electronic learning (agency object 418) to purchase resources to support their intervention work. For guidance on suggested resources, please contact Moore3@k12.dc.gov

Central Supports

Non-Financial

Reading Specialists and Reading Teachers are strongly encouraged to attend PD offered by the Office of Teaching and Learning. This includes English Language Arts sessions which are aligned to evidenced-based literacy practices and Reading Specialist/Teacher PD.

Points of Contact

  • Reading Specialists – Emily Hammett, Director, Elementary ELA and Social Studies, Hammett@k12.dc.gov
  • Reading Teachers – Shareen Cruz, Director, Content and Curriculum, Special Projects, Cruz2@k12.dc.gov
  • Reading Recovery—Linda Randall, Director, First Grade Academy randall@k12.dc.gov

Back To Budget Guide Homepage